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  • Code Documentation
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  • Type Declaration

Mongoid uses its own flavor of YARD for code documentation. Please note the conventions outlined in this document.

  • Modules: All class and module definitions should be preceded by a documentation comment.

    # This is the documentation for the class. It's amazing
    # what they do with corrugated cardboard these days.
    class CardboardBox
  • Methods: All method definitions should be preceded by a documentation comment. Use @param, @yield, and @return to specify inputs and output. For further details, refer to Type Declaration below.

    # Turn a person into whatever they'd like to be.
    #
    # @param [ Person ] person The human to transmogrify.
    #
    # @return [ Tiger ] The transmogrified result.
    def transmogrify(person)
  • Errors: Use @raise to explain errors specific to the method.

    # @raise [ Errors::Validations ] If validation failed.
    def validate!
  • Private Methods: Private methods should be documented unless they are so brief and straightforward that it is obvious what they do. Note that, for example, a method may be brief and straightforward but the type of its parameter may not be obvious, in which case the parameter must be appropriately documented.

    private
    # Documentation is optional here.
    def do_something_obvious
  • API Private: Classes and public methods which are not intended for external usage should be marked @api private. This macro does not require a comment.

    Note that, because Mongoid's modules are mixed into application classes, private visibility of a method does not necessarily indicate its status as an API private method.

    # This is an internal-only method.
    #
    # @api private
    def dont_call_me_from_outside
  • Notes and TODOs: Use @note to explain caveats, edge cases, and behavior which may surprise users. Use @todo to record follow-ups and suggestions for future improvement.

    # Clear all stored data.
    #
    # @note This operation deletes data in the database.
    # @todo Refactor this method for performance.
    def erase_data!
  • Deprecation: Use the @deprecated macro to indicate deprecated functionality. This macro does not require a comment.

    # This is how we did things back in the day.
    #
    # @deprecated
    def the_old_way
  • Line Wrapping: Use double-space indent when wrapping lines of macros. Do not indent line wraps in the description.

    # This is the description of the method. Line wraps in the description
    # should not be indented.
    #
    # @return [ Symbol ] For macros, wraps must be double-space indented
    # on the second, third, etc. lines.
  • Whitespace: Do not use leading/trailing empty comment lines, or more than one consecutive empty comment line.

    # GOOD:
    # @return [ Symbol ] The return value
    def my_method
    # BAD:
    # @return [ Symbol ] The return value
    #
    def my_method
    # BAD:
    # @param [ Symbol ] foo The input value
    #
    #
    # @return [ Symbol ] The return value
    def my_method(foo)
  • Type Unions: Use pipe | to denote a union of allowed types.

    # @param [ Symbol | String ] name Either a Symbol or a String.
  • Nested Types: Use angle brackets < > to denote type nesting.

    # @param [ Array<Symbol> ] array An Array of symbols.
  • Hash: Use comma , to denote the key and value types.

    # @param [ Hash<Symbol, Integer> ] hash A Hash whose keys are Symbols,
    # and whose values are Integers.
  • Array: Use pipe | to denote a union of allowed types.

    # @param [ Array<Symbol | String> ] array An Array whose members must
    # be either Symbols or Strings.
  • Array: Use comma , to denote the types of each position in a tuple.

    # @return [ Array<Symbol, Integer, Integer> ] A 3-member Array whose first
    # element is a Symbol, and whose second and third elements are Integers.
  • Array: Use pipe | on the top level if the inner types cannot be mixed within the Array.

    # @param [ Array<Symbol> | Array<Hash> ] array An Array containing only
    # Symbols, or an Array containing only Hashes. The Array may not contain
    # a mix of Symbols and Hashes.
  • Nested Types: For clarity, use square brackets [ ] to denote nested unions when commas are also used.

    # @param [ Hash<Symbol, [ true | false ]> ] hash A Hash whose keys are Symbols,
    # and whose values are boolean values.
  • Ruby Values: Specific values may be denoted in the type using Ruby syntax.

    # @param [ :before | :after ] timing One of the Symbol values :before or :after.
  • True, False, and Nil: Use true, false, and nil rather than TrueClass, FalseClass, and NilClass. Do not use Boolean as a type since it does not exist in Ruby.

    # GOOD:
    # @param [ true | false | nil ] bool A boolean or nil value.
    # BAD:
    # @param [ TrueClass | FalseClass | NilClass ] bool A boolean or nil value.
    # @param [ Boolean ] bool A boolean value.
  • Return Self: Specify return value self where a method returns self.

    # @return [ self ] Returns the object itself.
  • Splat Args: Use three-dot ellipses ... in the type declaration and star * in the parameter name to denote a splat.

    # @param [ String... ] *items The list of items name(s) as Strings.
    def buy_groceries(*items)
  • Splat Args: Do not use Array as the type unless each arg is actually an Array.

    # BAD:
    # @param [ Array<String> ] *items The list of items name(s) as Strings.
    def buy_groceries(*items)
    buy_groceries("Cheese", "Crackers", "Wine")
    # OK:
    # @param [ Array<String>... ] *arrays One or more arrays containing name parts.
    def set_people_names(*arrays)
    set_people_names(["Harlan", "Sanders"], ["Jane", "K", ""Doe"], ["Jim", "Beam"])
  • Splat Args: Use comma , to denote positionality in a splat.

    # @param [ Symbol..., Hash ] *args A list of names, followed by a hash
    # as the optional last arg.
    def say_hello(*args)
  • Splat Args: Specify type unions with square brackets [ ].

    # @param [ [ String | Symbol ]... ] *fields A splat of mixed Symbols and Strings.
  • Keyword Arguments: Following YARD conventions, use @param for keyword arguments, and specify keyword argument names as symbols.

    # @param [ String ] query The search string
    # @param [ Boolean ] :exact_match Whether to do an exact match
    # @param [ Integer ] :results_per_page Number of results
    def search(query, exact_match: false, results_per_page: 10)
  • Hash Options: Define hash key-value options with @option macro immediately following the Hash @param. Note @option parameter names are symbols.

    # @param opts [ Hash<Symbol, Object> ] The optional hash argument(s).
    # @option opts [ String | Array<String> ] :items The items(s) as Strings to include.
    # @option opts [ Integer ] :limit An Integer denoting the limit.
    def buy_groceries(opts = {})
  • Double Splats: Use double-star ** in the parameter name to denote a keyword arg splat (double splat). Note that type does not need declared on the double-splat element, as it is implicitly <Symbol, Object>. Instead, define value types with @option macro below. Note @option parameter names are symbols.

    # @param **kwargs The optional keyword argument(s).
    # @option **kwargs [ String | Array<String> ] :items The items(s) as Strings to include.
    # @option **kwargs [ Integer ] :limit An Integer denoting the limit.
    def buy_groceries(**kwargs)
  • Blocks: Use @yield to specify when the method yields to a block.

    # @yield [ Symbol, Symbol, Symbol ] Evaluate the guess of who did the crime.
    # Must take the person, location, and weapon used. Must return true or false.
    def whodunit
    yield(:mustard, :ballroom, :candlestick)
    end
  • Blocks: If the method explicitly specifies a block argument, specify the block argument using @param preceded by an ampersand &, and also specify @yield. Note @yield should be used even when method calls block.call rather than yield internally.

    # @param &block The block.
    # @yield [ Symbol, Symbol, Symbol ] Evaluate the guess of who did the crime.
    # Must take the person, location, and weapon used. Must return true or false.
    def whodunit(&block)
    yield(:scarlet, :library, :rope)
    end
    # @param &block The block.
    # @yield [ Symbol, Symbol, Symbol ] Evaluate the guess of who did the crime.
    # Must take the person, location, and weapon used. Must return true or false.
    def whodunit(&block)
    block.call(:plum, :kitchen, :pipe)
    end
  • Blocks: Use @yieldparam and @yieldreturn instead of @yield where beneficial for clarity.

    # @param &block The block.
    # @yieldparam [ Symbol ] The person.
    # @yieldparam [ Symbol ] The location.
    # @yieldparam [ Symbol ] The weapon used.
    # @yieldreturn [ true | false ] Whether the guess is correct.
    def whodunit(&block)
    yield(:peacock, :conservatory, :wrench)
    end
  • Proc Args: Proc arguments should use @param (not @yield). The inputs to the proc may be specified as subtype(s).

    # @param [ Proc<Integer, Integer, Integer> ] my_proc Proc argument which must
    # take 3 integers and must return true or false whether the guess is valid.
    def guess_three(my_proc)
    my_proc.call(42, 7, 88)
    end
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