MongoDB Radio: Our New Podcast Project

< View all blog posts
Bryan Reinero & Dana Groce
April 18, 2016
Category: Company

Welcome to the inaugural post of MongoDB Radio, our new podcast project. We’re very excited to bring you great content about MongoDB, the people who build it, and the people who use it. Throughout this series we will feature interviews with MongoDB engineers, experts in the field of distributed computing and databases, stories from our community and trends in technology, and much more. The world of distributed systems and next generation applications is a fascinating place, and we can’t wait to share it with you.

In episode one we spent time with Luke Lovett, a software engineer on the driver’s integration team at MongoDB. Among many things, Luke is responsible for maintaining one of our most popular projects – the Hadoop connector for MongoDB. The connector allows you to plug MongoDB into the Hadoop ecosystem of tools and perform sophisticated processing against the data within MongoDB.

We spoke with Luke during our developer conference in San Jose, where he was delivering a talk on some of the new features available on the connector. We discussed the connector in depth, what it’s like to work on an open source project with the community, and how he got started at MongoDB.


Join us for two days of GIANT thinking.

Learn more about MongoDB World


About the Author - Bryan Reinero

Bryan is US Developer Advocate at MongoDB fostering understanding and engagement in the community. Previously Bryan was a Senior Consulting Engineer at MongoDB, helping users optimize MongoDB for scale and performance and a contributor to the Java Driver for MongoDB.

Earlier, Bryan was Software Engineering Manager at Valueclick, building and managing large scale marketing applications for advertising, retargeting, real-time bidding and campaign optimization. Earlier still, Bryan specialized in software for embedded systems at Ricoh Corporation and developed data analysis and signal processing software at the Experimental Physics Branch of Ames Research Center.

comments powered by Disqus