developers

4 results

MongoDB Atlas Powers Half a Billion Players of India's Favorite Mobile Pastime, Ludo King

Nothing is more human than playing games. Boards and pieces can be found from the beginnings of civilization — little scraps of technology we created to entertain ourselves. No wonder, then, that gaming is a dominant force in mobile tech. What's more surprising is that some of the most successful mobile games are versions of some of the oldest traditions. Take Ludo. A classic board game for up to four players, it can trace its direct ancestry to 6th-century India and is built from much older ideas. Players roll a die to move pieces from home along a track to a finish; the first to get all pieces there wins. You can't pass an opponent on the track, but if you land on them they go back to the start. That's it. Simple. But the way it brings players together has been enough to make Ludo the national game of the subcontinent. Now Ludo is king of the phones, in the shape of Gametion's Ludo King app. A faithful yet stylish rendition of the board game, it retains the game's simplicity and social interaction, but at an epic scale. It topped the charts for Google Play downloads in India and reached the top ten internationally, with tens of millions of players chalking up a quarter of a billion minutes of playing time a day. At one point, numbers quadrupled overnight. Yet all this was managed by a tiny team of developers who'd built their platform on MongoDB Atlas , the global cloud database service. Gametion Founder and CEO Vikash Jaiswal Ludo King's authentic board game emulation quickly tapped into the Indian psyche. "We had strong takeup right from 2016, when we launched the first version," says Gametion founder and CEO Vikash Jaiswal. "A million downloads in the first 25 days, and up to a million minutes of play a day by the start of 2020. We were doing very well already. Then came the lockdown and we went through the roof." "We Just Wanted to Concentrate on the Game" Gametion was the quintessential small gaming startup. In 2015, it had a couple of developers out of a staff of four or five, and they'd produced a suite of in-browser Flash games. The next move was obviously mobile. But at first, the company didn't move far from the idea of a simple gaming experience. Jaiswal says: "There was no database component to the Flash games, no login or user ID. We launched Ludo King in 2016 as a single player game, and soon got the user feedback that they wanted multiplayer features. You need user accounts and user data for that." The company takes pride in how quickly it can adopt and incorporate new technologies, explains Jaiswal, but that means finding the right technology to adopt. And the game was exhibiting demanding growth. "Ludo King was becoming very popular, so we knew we needed something that could scale. It had to be quick to learn — we didn't have time for complexity or long learning curves." MongoDB seemed a good fit for an underlying database. I knew it was fast and very flexible to build on, and it had lots of features. And it turned out to be a really good fit for mobile gaming — MongoDB integrates very well into our Node.js architecture. It's a native speaker. Vikash Jaiswal, Founder and CEO, Gametion Jaiswal's team was able to rely on MongoDB's flexible data model to continually expand the game's features, including more options for players and monetisation tactics. That's never stopped. In 2020, Gametion introduced two new in-game features: voice chat and egreetings to users. But they had no interest in the nuts and bolts of database administration. "We didn't want to make our own backend or worry about scaling, management or any of that. We just wanted to concentrate on the game," says Jaiswal. MongoDB Atlas hadn't made its debut yet at the time — Gametion being ahead of the game -- so the company chose the third-party mLab platform for hosting. Then in 2019, after mLab was acquired by MongoDB Inc, Gametion transitioned from mLab to MongoDB Atlas, the platform made and managed by the company behind the database. MongoDB Atlas: A 'Native Speaker' for Mobile Gaming Transitions can be challenging, but with the same underlying architecture and the support of MongoDB itself, this one was straightforward. In fact, it was so uneventful that Jaiswal says he can't remember it happening. "I don't recall any problems at all. There was no downtime, which I definitely would have remembered. MongoDB managed it all for us. The migration must have been very smooth." Once on MongoDB Atlas, running on AWS's cloud infrastructure, the team — which was now five developers — quickly found the features that mattered, such as Continuous Cloud Backup and Performance Advisor . "The dashboard is very cool. We can dial up the performance we need when we need it, and see exactly what's going on." Ludo King's Lockdown Gametion's emphasis on common open standards and a component approach has made it easy to add other functions as the game demands, maintaining a regular schedule of updates that keep the users engaged. "You can think of it as a microservices architecture. We use Kafka to manage data movement and synchronize between services. It's another way to optimize resource use across the board without sacrificing scalability or release cadence." Infrastructure Diagram for Ludo King That's something you need when you go from being one of the top mobile games in India to the uncontested champ. "At the start of March 2020, we had between 150,000 and 200,000 simultaneous users, but when lockdown hit that month, it jumped to a million, 1.5 million. We went from 8,000 IOPS to peaking at 35,000." "With 145 million downloads in the first week of lockdown alone, quickly finding the rights answers was important," says Jaiswal. "We have 50 million users a day, averaging 50 minutes of gameplay each. Some of them are on for five, six hours at a stretch." MongoDB is Integral to Future Growth The future will see more features on Ludo King, such as league tables and what Gametion sees as its primary revenue generator: in-app purchases. It'll also see some brand-new games. MongoDB is integral to this strategy, both to power innovation and to manage the consequences of success. And Gametion's roadmap is growing with its market, which means it will need features for economically managing huge numbers of casual users. " Atlas Data Lake looks useful," says Jaiswal. "We want to move inactive players — those who haven't been online in a while — away from the main database, but we don't want to just delete them." Efficiently managing hundreds of millions of users — and supporting near-instantaneous, 1,000% growth — would have once required the resources of a large corporation. But for Gametion, which still has fewer than 100 employees, these aren't limiting factors. In August 2020, India Prime Minister Narendra Modi even highlighted the success of the the game during his monthly radio programme. Ludo King is helping to fulfill the vision of popularising Indian games with a global audience. For now, Gametion's focus is growth. And MongoDB is part of that experience, the game piece that shows where you are and implements your strategy, quietly and efficiently. MongoDB Atlas is not just a database, it's a genuine game changer. Try MongoDB Atlas Free

October 9, 2020

Technology Adoption and the Power of Convenience

Just as the ink was drying on my ReadWrite piece on how the convenience of public cloud computing is steamrolling over concerns about security and control, Redmonk ÃÂ_ber-analyst Stephen O’Grady posts an exceptional review of why we should “not underestimate the power of convenience.” As he writes: One of the biggest challenges for vendors built around traditional procurement patterns is their tendency to undervalue convenience. Developers, in general, respond to very different incentives than do their executive purchasing counterparts. Where organizational buyers tend to be less price sensitive and more focused on issues relating to reliability and manageability, as one example, individual developers tend to be more concerned with cost and availability - convenience, in other words. Because you are who you build for, then, enterprise IT products tend to be more secure and compliant and less convenient than developer-oriented alternatives. None of which would be a problem for old-guard IT vendors if developers, not to mention line of business executives, didn’t have increased control over what gets used in the enterprise. From open source to SaaS, legacy procurement processes are fracturing in the face of developers, in particular, building what they want when they want. Because of the cloud. Because of open source. Because of convenience. O’Grady points to a variety of technologies, including MongoDB, Linux, Chef/Puppet, Git, and dynamic programming languages, that have taken off because they’re so easy to use compared to legacy (and often proprietary) incumbents. Most are open source but, as I point out in my ReadWrite article, “open” isn’t always required. Microsoft SharePoint and Salesforce.com, for example, are both proprietary but also easier to adopt than the crufty ECM and on-premise CRM systems they displaced. The key, again, is convenience. It’s one of the things that drew me to 10gen. MongoDB isn’t perfect, but its data model makes life so easy on developers that its adoption has been impressive. That flexibility and ease of use is why MTV and others have embraced MongoDB. With convenience comes adoption, and with adoption comes time to resolve the issues any product will have. Most recently, this has resulted in 10gen removing MongoDB’s global write-lock in MongoDB version 2.2 , as well as changing the default write behavior with MongoClient . All while growing community and revenues at a torrid pace. Back to O’Grady. As he concludes, “with developers increasingly taking an active hand in procurement, convenience is a dangerous feature to ignore.” I couldn’t agree more. - Posted by Matt Asay, vice president of Corporate Strategy. Tagged with: Stephen O'Grady, Redmonk, convenience, ease of use, flexibility, MTV, global write-lock, developers, Linux, ReadWrite

December 20, 2012