Charts

33 results

Visualize Blended Atlas and AWS S3 Data From Atlas Data Lake with MongoDB Charts

We’re excited to announce that MongoDB Charts supports Atlas Data Lake as a data source! You can now use Charts to easily visualize data stored across different Atlas databases and AWS S3 buckets. Thanks to the aggregating power of Atlas Data Lake’s federated query, creating charts and graphs from blended application and cloud object data is simpler than ever before. On the surface this powerful integration is as simple as adding your Atlas Data Lake as a data source within Charts. However, it unlocks a deeper level of analysis while eliminating the need for creating an Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) process across your Atlas and S3 data. The integration provides the ability to visualize data from the following combination of sources without writing any code: Data from many Atlas databases or clusters, including multi-cloud clusters Cloud storage data from AWS S3 Blended Atlas and cloud storage (AWS S3) data Scenario: Finding insights from aggregated customer profile and contract data Let’s add a real world scenario of how this can enhance the analytics you derive from your data. While doing so, we will walk through the steps of setting up your Atlas Data Lake, adding it as a data source to Charts, and getting the most of your data with Charts’ powerful visualization capabilities. For context, let’s imagine we’re an analyst at a telecom company and we have contract data that is stored in MongoDB Atlas in different clusters and databases for each country we operate in - United States and Canada. Second, we have offloaded data from our Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tool as a parquet file into an AWS S3 bucket. All three datasets share a common “customerID” field. Configure Atlas Data Lake Because both “contracts” collections (or datasets) in MongoDB Atlas share the same fields, I simply mapped both into a single collection within the data lake. I mapped the customer profiles dataset into its own collection, since it only shares the “customerID” field. However, now that it’s in the same data lake, I will easily be able to join it to my contract data with a $lookup in my Charts aggregation pipeline or with a Lookup Field in the chart builder. (A $lookup in the MongoDB Query API is equivalent to a join in SQL.) Configure Charts data source I want to find insights from all contracts, both US and Canada in this scenario. Once I have created a single Atlas Data Lake collection (DL_contracts.allcontracts) from the two separate databases, I then need to add it as a data source in Charts. Simply click on “add data source” within Charts and add your data lake, and then choose the collections we want to use in the next step. For completeness I also added the two Atlas collections (US and Canada contracts) as data sources in Charts by following the same steps. Visualize data across multiple Atlas databases With Atlas Data Lake’s federated query capability, which effectively performs a union of data, I am able to build a column chart that shows the amount of all US and CA contracts in a single chart without writing any code. As you can see below, the chart shows both US and CA columns when connected to the data lake collection. When the data source is switched directly to either Atlas database, it only shows data for that respective database, or country in this example. Visualize blended data from Atlas and an AWS S3 bucket Lastly, let’s take our insights to the next level by visualizing data from multiple Atlas databases and a parquet file that’s stored in an AWS S3 bucket. Adding customer profile data that I offloaded from my CRM tool into S3 will enable me to find more robust insights. I could also visualize the data from the parquet file alone by connecting to that data lake collection. Since the contract data and customer profile data are in different collections within my Atlas Data Lake, I created a $lookup in the aggregation pipeline of the Charts data source. I then created a table chart from three different data sources with conditional formatting to quickly identify high value customers. The columns with blue boxes include contract data from both Atlas clusters, while the columns with orange boxes include customer profile data from a parquet file via AWS S3 bucket. Note, I could also aggregate the data in Atlas Data Lake and use $out to create a new collection of the data , and then connect Charts to the new collection as a data source. For the purposes of this blog, I wanted to highlight Charts-specific aggregation capabilities. We hope that you’re excited about the ability to easily visualize multiple data sources, from multiple Atlas databases to AWS S3 buckets in one place! Remember, if you haven’t used Charts before, you can get started for free by signing up for MongoDB Cloud , deploying an Atlas cluster and activating Charts. Try MongoDB Atlas for free today!

July 9, 2021

Import and Export Your Charts Dashboards

With the latest release of MongoDB Charts, we’ve added the ability to export any dashboard to a file, as well as import those files back into a Charts project. To export a dashboard, simply choose Export Dashboard from the dashboard’s tile on the main Dashboards page. To Import a dashboard, choose the command from the menu next to Add Dashboard. Let’s look at some things you can do with this new capability. Copy dashboards between projects MongoDB Cloud allows you to create multiple projects, each of which has its own Atlas cluster. There are a bunch of reasons to use multiple projects, but one common example is to use them for different environments of an application, such as Development, QA or Production. Each Charts dashboard also lives within a project, and up until now there was no way of moving or copying a dashboard between projects. This could be problematic if a dashboard that was created in the Development project needed to be promoted to QA or Production. WIth the new Import/Export feature, you can simply export a dashboard from one project and import it into another. Version control your dashboards Taking this example one step further, now that you can export your dashboards to a file, you can treat them as code. That allows you to store the dashboard definitions in a source control system, making it easy to track changes, go back to specific versions, and keep the dashboards stored safely alongside other code artefacts used in your solution. Share dashboards with the community While some dashboards only make sense when connected to your own private data, others may be built on a commonly-available schema, whether that’s the Atlas sample data , some open data from the web, or data created by a reusable script . Once you’ve built a great dashboard using this generally available data, why not export it and share it with the world? Copy dashboards and change their data sources Whenever you import a dashboard from a file, Charts will give you the opportunity to “remap” the data sources used on the dashboard. This is important because the data in the new project might not match what was in the original project. You can use this feature to your advantage if you want to quickly change the data sources used on a dashboard, even if you are importing back into the same project. As an example, suppose you are a multinational company and used a different collection to track sales in each country you operate in. You could build a dashboard with a bunch of great charts, all linked to your “US Sales” collection. If you wanted to easily build an equivalent dashboard for your Australian sales, you could simply export the US dashboard, reimport it and remap your data sources on import to the “Australian Sales” collection. Migrate from Charts on-prem Finally, this feature provides a great option for Charts on-prem users who want to move to the cloud and take advantage of all of the new features only available to cloud users. While the on-prem version of Charts does not have the Export feature, on-prem users can contact MongoDB Support to obtain a script that will generate export files for on-prem dashboards. Those files can then be imported into your MongoDB Cloud projects using the new Import feature. We hope you’re as excited about this feature as we are! Remember, if you haven’t used Charts before, you can get started for free by signing up for MongoDB Cloud , deploying an Atlas cluster and activating Charts.

June 24, 2021

Distinguish Data, Get Insights Faster with Conditional Formatting in Charts

The latest release of MongoDB Charts adds Conditional Formatting; an exciting new feature that enables chart authors to highlight important changes in their chart data, based on a set of rules that they define. Conditional Formatting rules can be applied to table charts and number charts . Why use Conditional Formatting? For table charts, the data is densely packed into the visualisation using rows and columns. This is great for comparing many values simultaneously, but as the density increases it may become more difficult to find and focus on the data that matters. Many authors use Number charts to track key individual metrics within their data. While the number itself can be useful, sometimes it isn’t enough to convey other necessary information for its context – for instance, is a high number good or bad? Conditional Formatting can aid users in understanding the data by applying different styles based on rules to highlight what is important, and to provide them with more context. See Conditional Formatting in Action with Formula 1 Data Formula 1 motorsport is what I like to refer to as the “sport of nerds”, because analyzing and understanding huge amounts of data, and being able to quickly make a decision on that analysis can be the difference between winning and losing. So let’s see how Conditional Formatting can help with this task using data from the 2021 FIA Formula 1 World Championship. Single Color Conditional Formatting Let’s start off with something simple. Below is a table showing the 2021 Drivers Championship after three rounds. A driver’s position in the championship is determined by the total number of points they have been awarded over successive rounds of the season. Let’s edit this chart and add Conditional Formatting to highlight the top three drivers in the championship with colors to represent 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place. Click on the Customize tab , and then click on the Conditional Formatting menu to expand the accordion. As you can see we haven’t yet defined any rules, so let’s add a new rule by clicking the + Add button. A drawer will open up from the left hand side of the screen displaying the Add Format Rules view. A conditional formatting rule must have at least one condition, and all conditions must match in order for the rule to be applied. Let’s highlight the row of the driver currently in 1st place by adding a single color rule with one condition. Since this rule will be determined by the driver’s current position in the championship, we need to add a condition to act on this data. We can target this field by selecting Pos from the Applies to select control. Now that we know what field we are targeting, we must next choose an operator to use for the comparison. Since we are only interested in data that matches a specific value, we select the Equal To numeric operator. Next we must provide an input for the operand to be compared to. For this rule we are only interested in highlighting the driver that is in first place in the championship, so we enter a value of 1 into the Input . You can think of this condition as saying; “is the value of the field Pos equal to the value of 1?” If it is, then apply the styling of this rule, otherwise do not. Finally we choose what styling changes should be applied by choosing from the options under Styling . In this example, we want to highlight the background color of the cell in a gold color to signify 1st place, and we will also apply a bold font weight to the text to make it more prominent. Additionally we also would like for these styles to be applied to the entire row, and not just the cell that the condition is applicable to, so we will check the Format entire row option. And that’s it! Once we save the rule, you’ll notice that the table re-renders in the Chart Builder Preview to show that the data is being evaluated correctly and the Conditional Formatting rule is applied. We then simply rinse and repeat this process to add additional rules to highlight the drivers in 2nd and 3rd place, resulting in the following output: Color Scale Conditional Formatting When comparing tabular data, sometimes it is desirable to use color to show where each value lies relative to other values in the column. The table below shows the race results for the third round of the 2021 FIA Formula 1 World Championship. Each row displays the final result for each driver taking part in the race. Let’s compare the Average Speed of each driver’s Fastest Lap using a Color Scale Conditional Formatting rule. Navigate to the Add Format Rule screen in the same way by going to “Customize > Conditional Formatting > + Add” , but this time select the Color Scale radio option. Note: Conditional Formatting Color Scale rules can only have one condition, and this condition can only be applied to fields in a Table Chart encoded as Value columns. Select the Fastest Lap Average Speed as the target for the condition. You’ll notice that unlike the discrete Single Color rules, there are no other settings to configure for the condition. This is because a Color Scale will compare the values across the documents in sort order, and will determine a background color to apply to the cell based on the rank of the value within the range. Since we are interested in finding the highest Average Speed across each driver’s fastest lap, we will select a sequential color scale, where higher values are colored green, and lower values are colored in white. Save the rule to see the changes applied. As you can see, for the third round of the 2021 FIA Formula 1 World Championship, the fastest lap average speed was set by Valtteri Bottas at a blistering speed of 209.74 km/h (130.32 mph)! And there we have it. I hope this brief introduction to Conditional Formatting has highlighted (pun intended) the capabilities of this exciting new feature! In this post we’ve only scratched the surface of what’s possible though, Conditional Formatting has many many more powerful operators than what we have demonstrated here, including matching values by range, regular expression and even ranks. Why not take it for a test drive yourself to see what is possible? If you haven’t tried Charts yet, it’s quick, easy and free to get started. Simply sign up for MongoDB Cloud , deploy a free Atlas cluster and click Charts in the top navigation bar. You can also ask questions on the MongoDB Developer Community Forums , or suggest new or improved features using the MongoDB Feedback Engine .

May 13, 2021

Dive Deeper into Chart Data with New Drill-Down Capability

With the latest release of MongoDB Charts, you’re now able to dive deeper into the data that’s aggregated in your visualizations. At a high level, we generally create charts, graphs and visualizations of our data to answer questions about our business or products. Oftentimes, we need to “double click” on those visualizations to get insight into each individual data point that makes up the line, bar, column, etc. How the drill-down functionality works: Step 1: Right click on the data point you are interested in drilling down into Step 2: Click "show data for this item" Step 3: View the data in tabular or document format Each view can be better for different circumstances. For data without too many fields or no nested arrays, it might be quicker and more easily viewed in a table. On the other hand, the JSON view allows you to explore the structure of documents and click into arrays. Scenarios where more detailed information can help: Data visualization use cases are relatively broad spanning, but oftentimes they fall into 3 main categories: monitoring data, finding insights, and embedding analytics into applications. I’ll be focusing on the first two of these three as there are many different ways you could potentially build drilling-down into data via embedded charts. (Read more about our click events and embedded analytics ). For data or performance monitoring purposes , we're not speaking so much about the performance of your actual database and its underlying infrastructure, but the performance of the application or system built on top of the database. Imagine I have an application or website that takes reviews, if I build a chart like the one below where I want to easily see when an interaction hits a threshold that I want to dive deeper into, I now have the ability to quickly see the document that created that data point. This chart shows app ratings given after a user session in an app. For this example, we want to dive into any rating that was below a 3 (out of 5). This scatter plot shows I have two such ratings that cross that threshold. With the drill-down capability, I can easily see all the details captured in that user session. For finding new insights, let’s imagine I’m tracking how many transactions happen on my ecommerce site over time. In the column chart below, you can see I have purchases by month for the last year and a half (note, there’s a gap because this example is for a seasonal business!). Just by glancing at the chart, I can quickly see purchases have increased over time, and my in-app purchases have increased my overall sales. However, I want to see more about the documents that were aggregated to create those columns, so I can quickly see details about the transaction amount and location without needing to create another chart or dashboard filter. In both examples, I was able to answer a deeper level question that the original chart couldn’t answer on it’s own. We hope this new feature helps you and your stakeholders get more out of MongoDB Charts, regardless if you’re new to it or have been visualizing your Atlas data with it for months, if not years! If you haven’t tried Charts yet, you can get started for free by signing up for a MongoDB Atlas and deploying a free tier cluster.

April 6, 2021

Add Interactivity to Your Embedded Analytics with Click Events

MongoDB Charts’ data visualizations can now become more interactive, so users and stakeholders can dive deeper into the insights they care more about. That’s possible with a new feature currently in beta with support for most Charts types: click events. A click event in the Charts embedding SDK is simply a notification that a user clicked on a chart. That click could be anything: They might have clicked on a bar in a bar chart, a chart’s legend, or even empty white space within the chart. Web developers can subscribe to these events and create different functionality depending on where the user clicked. Why might you want to enhance your app or embedded analytics workflow with click event data? Click-event data opens up a wide range of possibilities. Here are a couple of examples, inspired by various Charts users who’ve been telling us how they’d like to use click-event data. Open up another chart, based on a user clicking on data within a chart: A logistics company has a bar chart that shows pending orders at an aggregate level per region, and they want to see more detail on pending orders for a specific region. They create a click event handler in their application that opens up a new chart with pending orders per supplier, based on the region selected in the aggregate chart. Filtering the other charts on a dashboard when a series or data point on a single chart is clicked: A retail clothing company has a dashboard with various shopping cart information such as sales, orders processed, and returns, for their portfolio of products. The head of outerwear sales only wants to see data for the “outerwear” category of products, so they click on the “outerwear” series within a bar chart. The rest of the dashboard can adapt so that it shows only information relevant to outerwear. The example below is created from one of our sample data sets. We created two charts in a single app, tied to the sample movie data set that every Atlas user can access. On the left is a stacked bar chart with category level data that includes genre and decade. On the right is a table chart that shows each individual movie within a category. Clicking on a specific category in the bar chart updates the movies shown in the table chart. How can you get started with click events of embedded charts? If you haven’t yet used the embedding SDK for MongoDB Charts, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with the docs , consider watching this video tutorial , and access the SDK via the Charts GitHub repository . Regardless if you’re new to using the SDK or have experience with it, it’s important to note that you will need to use the @mongodb-js/charts-embed-dom@beta tagged version of the SDK to have access to the click events functionality while it’s in beta. There are two examples specifically for click events in the repository: click-events-basic and click-events-filtering . If you just want to explore and test out the functionality, you can play around with them in the following sandboxes using codesandbox.io: Click events basic sandbox Click events filtering sandbox Here’s a snapshot of the data surfaced in a click event that is available for developers to use in their apps. In this example I clicked on the yellow section of the top bar in the Movie Genres chart above. Note how it includes details of the click coordinates, the type and role of the clicked mark, and the corresponding chart data for the mark. { "chartId": "90a8fe84-dd27-4d53-a3fc-0e40392685dd", "event": { "type": "click", "altKey": false, "ctrlKey": false, "shiftKey": false, "metaKey": false, "offsetX": 383, "offsetY": 15, "clientX": 403, "clientY": 99, "pageX": 403, "pageY": 99, "screenX": 756, "screenY": 217 }, "data": { "y": { "label": "Genre", "value": "Drama" }, "x": { "label": "# Movies", "value": 3255 }, "color": { "label": "Decade", "value": "2010 - 2020", "lowerBound": 2010, "upperBound": 2020 } }, "target": { "type": "rect", "role": "mark", "fill": "#F0D175" }, "apiVersion": 1 } Whether you’re an avid user or new to MongoDB Charts, we hope you consider taking advantage of the new click event capability to increase the interactivity of Charts. It’s in beta because there is more functionality still to come. It has yet to be released for a few chart types: geospatial, table, top item, word cloud, and number charts. On that note, we’d love to hear your thoughts through the MongoDB Feedback Engine . If you haven’t tried Charts yet, you can get started for free by signing up for a MongoDB Atlas and deploying a free tier cluster.

January 20, 2021

New Ways to Customize Your Charts

When it comes to building charts, we know that details matter. Small differences in layout, styling or composition can make a big difference in how well your chart communicates the story behind your data. That’s why we’ve just released a whole bunch of new capabilities in MongoDB Charts , giving you more control than ever. Here’s what’s new: Secondary Y Axis: Charts can be a great way to show correlation between two different datasets, but when their scales differ greatly it can be hard to see the correlation. By choosing to plot one more series on a secondary Y Axis, you can allow them to make the most of the available space and highlight any interesting relationships. Secondary Y Axis can be enabled on Grouped Column, Discrete Line, Continuous Line and Continuous Area charts. Legend Position: Chart legends can now be moved to the top, right or bottom of your chart, or hidden altogether. “All Others” Group: Charts has long allowed you to limit a chart to show, say, just the top 10 values. The new “All Others” option allows you to add an additional bar or donut segment that shows the value of all other categories not included in the limit. “Count by Value” aggregation: Building multi-series charts is now easier than ever, with the new “Count by Value” aggregation option. This will automatically create series from each distinct value found in a field. String binning with Regular Expressions: Last month we introduced binning of string values, allowing you to choose the exact values to go into each bin. This month we’ve extended this further by allowing you to use Regular Expressions to assign values to a bin based on powerful patterns. Scatter Mark formatting: We’ve ramped up the customization options available on Scatter charts, allowing you to control the size, border thickness and opacity of each plotted mark. Line Dash Styles: A new option on Discrete and Continuous Line charts results in a different dash style for each series, making it easier to differentiate the series and improve the accessibility of your charts. Here’s one example of a chart that shows off the secondary Y axis, custom legend position and line dash styles: And here’s another, showing the effect you can get by customizing your scatter chart’s mark style: We hope you enjoy these new charting capabilities, but we’re not done yet! Over the next couple of months, we’ll be moving our focus to Table charts, adding options like conditional formatting, text wrapping and column pinning. If you have any other ideas for new customization features, please let us know using the MongoDB Feedback Engine . If you haven’t tried Charts yet, you can get started for free by signing up for MongoDB Atlas and deploying a free tier cluster.

November 18, 2020