Jackie Denner

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Sales Development Series: Meet the EMEA Account Development Team

Sales Development is a crucial part of the Sales organization at MongoDB. Our Sales Development function is broken down into Sales Development Representatives (SDRs), who qualify and validate inbound opportunities from both existing and prospective customers, and Account Development Representatives (ADRs), who support outbound opportunities by planning and executing pipeline generation strategies. Both of these roles offer an excellent path to kickstarting your career in sales at MongoDB. In this blog post, you’ll learn more about our EMEA (Europe, the Middle East, and Africa) outbound ADR team, which is divided into territories covering the UK & Ireland, the Nordics & Benelux, Central Europe, and Southern Europe. Hear from Manager David Sinnott and a few Account Development Representatives about the ADR role, team culture, and how MongoDB is enabling ADRs to grow their career. Check out the first blog in our Sales Development series here . An overview of Account Development in EMEA David Sinnot , Sales Development Manager for the UK & Ireland The Account Development team works very closely with our Enterprise Sales organization, supporting some of our largest customers across all industries. ADRs partner with Enterprise Account Executives to identify and uncover some of the biggest challenges facing their customers and through further discovery, position MongoDB as the solution to help solve whatever these challenges are. I started my own career in tech sales as a Sales Development Representative 11 years ago. In tech sales, reps will have lots of successes and challenges and personally, I have always used these experiences as a way to try and better myself. My advice to reps just starting out is when things are not going to plan, take a step back to analyze the reason why, learn from it, and implement some new methods to avoid it happening again. The opportunity to learn never stops at MongoDB. My team and I learn something new every day! Our products are always evolving and we continue to release added features and functionality, so we continually provide training around all of this. ADRs also spend a great deal of time learning about and implementing the sales methodology frameworks that MongoDB uses across the entire Sales organization. There are promotion paths available to all of the ADRs, whether that be staying in Sales or exploring other parts of the business, such as Marketing or Customer Success. All of the knowledge and skills picked up during their time as ADRs ensure that they hit the ground running once they are promoted to their next role within the business, whatever that may be. Some of the most successful Corporate and Enterprise reps in MongoDB started their own careers here as part of the ADR program. We do our absolute best to support all team members in deciding what is the best career path for them in the long term. MongoDB is disrupting an industry that largely hasn’t changed in over 40 years. We currently have around a 1% market share of the database market, which IDC predicts will be close to $119B by 2025, so the potential for MongoDB is still massive. With data being at the core of every modern-day business, organizations are having to modernize their legacy technology stacks and are starting to move more of their business functions to the cloud. MongoDB has an opportunity to play a big part in all of these initiatives and transformations. It’s still an incredibly exciting time for any sales rep out there who may be considering MongoDB for their next move. Hear from some team members Johanna Sterneck , Sr. Account Development Representative for Central Europe I joined MongoDB because I wanted to be part of a fast-growing, successful company that would help me grow professionally and personally. Over the past 10 months, every day has been a new experience and I feel that I’ve become part of something bigger. My onboarding experience was completely remote, but my team, manager, and everyone else at MongoDB have been very welcoming and supportive. The entire onboarding process was very well structured which allowed me to ramp up quickly. As an ADR, persistence in getting things done and positivity are definitely key factors in my role. What’s exciting is learning from the people around me and the great feedback culture we have. My team is very supportive, caring, and fun, and we are all happy to go the extra mile to achieve our goals. Federica Ramondino , Sr. Account Development Representative for Southern Europe I joined MongoDB because I believed it was a company where I could develop my skills and grow professionally. I’ve stayed because it lived up to my expectations! I see a clear career path for myself here, and I am excited to progress into my next role and get closer to my final objective of becoming a manager. To excel in an ADR role, you need dedication, good time and stakeholder management skills, and a positive attitude! My team is an amazing bunch of people that are always positive and keen on helping each other, even in a constantly evolving environment. What’s exciting about this role is all the other teams that you get to work with and learn from, from Sales to Customer Success and Marketing. Ruhan Jay Bora , Sr. Account Development Representative for the UK & Ireland I joined MongoDB because I was keen to work for a company creating experiences for the future, and I wanted to be a key player in helping companies digitally transform. I see myself staying at MongoDB for a while because of the heavy emphasis that leadership places on development. I have monthly catch-up sessions with the VP of Sales for EMEA, VP of Cloud Partners, and regular 1:1’s with my managers. Not a day goes by where I feel like I’m stagnating, and between learning about the latest in tech and sharpening my client-facing skills, there is plenty more room to grow! If you want to be successful as an ADR, the first thing you need to have is a tremendous work ethic. I believe sales is ultimately a game of grit, perseverance, and resilience. It’s not easy to learn so many technical concepts in the span of a few weeks, but our Sales Enablement team has compiled a bevy of excellent and readily digestible content that makes upskilling on MongoDB much easier. I will be moving into a new organization formed by our Sales team called the Associate Account Executive program. I harbor an ambition to become an Enterprise Account Executive, and this program will help me to develop the skills needed to work regularly with some of our most exciting clients! The feeling of seeing a client's satisfaction and astonishment at how MongoDB can solve some of their technical and business challenges truly amazes you. Hearing how great MongoDB is directly from clients makes you realize we really have a great product. I also find that the opportunity to accelerate your career here is extremely tangible. The company is young enough for you to shape your own path and no goal is too ambitious. The ability to engage with senior leadership up to the C-level is great too. Interested in joining the Sales team at MongoDB? We have several open roles on our team and would love for you to transform your career with us!

October 26, 2021

MongoDB Employees Share Their Coming Out Stories: (Inter)National Coming Out Day 2021

National Coming Out Day is celebrated annually on October 11 and is widely recognized in the United States. MongoDB proudly supports and embraces the LGBTQIA+ community across the globe, so we’ve reimagined this celebration as (Inter)National Coming Out Day. In our yearly tradition of honoring (Inter)National Coming Out Day, we asked employees who are members of the LGBTQIA+ community to share their coming out experiences. These are their stories. Jamie Ivanov , Escalation Manager For as long as I can remember, I always wanted to play with dolls and felt closer to my female cousins. This was rather difficult for someone who is a male at birth being brought up in a fairly conservative family. At a young age, I knew that I was different but lacked a way to describe it. I certainly didn't have the support I needed, so I was brought up as a male. My father went out of his way to “make a man out of me” and toughen me up in ways that weren't exactly the most productive. Going through school, I still knew that I was different because I kept feeling attracted to both genders, but I was too afraid to admit to it. I found a youth group for LGBT teenagers that gave me a safe place to be myself and admit to people who I really was. Outside of that group was still pretty scary; I knew that I had to be straight or I would risk being beaten up or harassed, so I tried to push my queerness aside. In my 30s, after going through the Army and having three children, I realized that I couldn't keep pretending anymore -- who I was wasn't the true me. I started telling people that I was bisexual and hoping that they wouldn't see me as less of a person. Most of the responses I received were "yeah, we kinda figured.” Having that weight off of my shoulders was immensely relieving but something still wasn't quite right; while admitting that helped explain who I was interested in, it still didn't explain who I was. Through a series of fortunate unfortunate events, a lot of the facade I had built up for so many years came down, and I realized that who I was didn't match the body that I was given. It was terrifying to talk to anyone about how I was feeling or who I was, but I finally told people that I am a transgender woman. It was one of the scariest things that I have ever done. Some people didn't understand, and I did lose some family over it, but most people accepted me for who I am with open arms! Since being true to myself, more weight has been lifted off of me, and my only regret is not having the resources and courage to admit who I really was years and years ago. Since I've come out as bi/pansexual and a transgender woman, I've built stronger relationships and felt much more comfortable with myself, even to the point of liking photos of myself (which is something I've always hated and realized it was because it wasn't the real me). When a MongoDB recruiter reached out to me, I asked him the same question I asked other recruiters: "How LGBT friendly is MongoDB (with an emphasis on the transgender part)?" The response I got back from my technical recruiter Bryan Spears was the best response I had received from ANY recruiter, or company, and was the deciding factor in why I chose to work at MongoDB. Here’s what he said: “MongoDB is a company that truly does its best to follow our values like embracing the power of differences; we have many employees who identify as LGBTQ+ or are allies of the LGBTQ+ community. We also have two ERGs, MongoDB Queeries and UGT (Underrepresented Genders in Tech), which both aim to create and maintain a safe environment for those identifying as LGBTQ+ or questioning. From a benefits standpoint, we have expanded the amount of WPATH Standards of Care services available for people who identify as Transgender, Gender Nonconforming, or Transsexual through Cigna. While I know none of the information I have shared tells you what life is like at MongoDB, I hope that it shows we are doing our best to make sure that everyone feels respected and welcome here.” I didn't always have the support I needed to be myself at some previous jobs but MongoDB has raised the bar to a level that is hard to compete with. I'm happy to finally find a place that truly accepts me for who I am. Ryan Francis , VP of Global Demand Generation & Field Marketing Growing up in the 90s in what I used to call “the buckle of the Bible Belt,” I did not believe coming out was in the cards. In fact, I would sit up at night to devise my grand escape to New York City after being disowned (how I planned on paying for said escape remains unknown). I was, however, out to my best friend, Maha. During the summer between my Sophomore and Junior years of high school, I spent time with her family in Egypt. On the return trip, I bought a copy of The Advocate to learn about the big gay life that awaited me after my great escape. Later that month, my mother stumbled upon that magazine when she was cleaning the house. She waited six months to bring it up, but one day in January sat me down in the living and asked, “Are you gay?” I paused for a moment and said… “yup.” She started crying and thanked me for being honest with her. A month later, she picked up a rainbow coffee mug at a yard sale and has been Mrs. PFLAG ever since, organizing pride rallies in our little Indiana hometown and sitting on the Episcopal church vestry this year in order to push through our parish’s blessing of same-sex marriage. Needless to say, I didn’t have to escape. My father was also unequivocally accepting. This is a good thing because my sister Lindsay is a Lesbian, so they sure would have had a tough time given 100% of their kids turned out gay. Lindsay is the real hero here who stayed in our homeland to raise her children with her wife, changing minds every day so that, hopefully, there will be fewer and fewer kids who actually have to make that great escape. Angie Byron , Principal Community Manager Growing up in the Midwest in the 80s and 90s, I was always a “tomboy;” as a young kid, I gravitated to toys like Transformers and He-Man and refused to wear pink or dresses. Since we tended to have a lot in common, most of my best friends growing up were boys; I tended to feel awkward and shy around girls and didn’t really understand why at the time. I was also raised both Catholic and Bahá’í, which led to a very interesting mix of perspectives. While both religions have vastly different belief and value systems, the one thing they could agree on was that homosexuality was wrong (“intrinsically immoral and contrary to the natural law” in the case of Catholicism, and “an affliction that should be overcome” in the case of Bahá’í). Additionally, being “out” as queer at that time in that part of the United States would generally get you made fun of, if not the everlasting crap kicked out of you, so finding other queer people felt nearly impossible. As a result, I was in strong denial about who I was for most of my childhood and gave several valiant but ultimately failed attempts at the whole “trying to date guys” thing as a teenager (I liked guys just fine as friends, but when it came to kissing and stuff it was just, er… no.). In the end, I came to the reluctant realization that I must be a lesbian. I knew no other queer people in my life, and so was grappling with this reality alone, feeling very isolated and depressed. So, I threw myself into music and started to find progressively more and more feminist/queer punk bands whose songs resonated with my experiences and what I was feeling: Bikini Kill, Team Dresch, The Need, Sleater-Kinney, and so on. I came out to my parents toward the end of junior high, quite by accident. Even though I had no concrete plan for doing so, I always figured Mom would be the more accepting one, given that she was Bahá’i (a religion whose basic premise is the unity of religions and equality of humanity), and I’d have to work on Dad for a bit, since he was raised Catholic and came from a family with more conservative values from an even smaller town in the midwest. Imagine my surprise when one day, Mom and I were watching Ricky Lake or Sally Jesse Raphael or one of those daytime talk shows. The topic was something like “HELP! I think my son might be gay!” My mom said something off-handed like “Wow, I don’t know what I would do if one of you came out to me as gay...” And, in true 15-year old angsty fashion, I said, “Oh YEAH? Well you better FIGURE IT OUT because I AM!” and ran into my room and slammed the door. I remember Mom being devastated, wondering what she did wrong as a parent, and so on. I told her, truly, nothing. My parents were both great parents; home was my sanctuary from bullying at school, and my siblings and I were otherwise accepted exactly as we were, tomboys or otherwise. After we’d finished talking, she told me that I had better go tell my father, so I begrudgingly went downstairs. “Dad… I’m gay.” Instead of a lecture or expressing disdain, he just said, “Oh really? I run a gay support group at your Junior High!” and I was totally mind blown. Bizarro world. He was the social worker at my school, so this makes sense, but it was the exact opposite reaction that I was expecting. An important life lesson in not prejudging people. When I moved onto high school, we got… drumroll ... the Internet. Here things take a much happier turn. Through my music, I was able to find a small community of fellow queers (known as Chainsaw), including a ton of us from various places in the Midwest. I was able to learn that I was NOT a freak, I was NOT alone, there were SO many other folks who felt the exact same way, and they were all super rad! We would have long talks into the night, support each other through hardships, and more than a few of us met each other in person and hung out in “real life.” Finding that community truly saved my life, and the lives of so many others. (Side-note: This is also how I got into tech because the chat room was essentially one gaping XSS vulnerability, and I taught myself HTML by typing various tags in and seeing how they rendered.) I never explicitly came out to anyone in my hometown. I was too scared to lose important relationships (it turns out I chose my friends well, and they were all completely fine with it, but the prospect of further isolating myself as a teenager was too terrifying at the time). Because of that, when I moved to a whole new country (Canada) and went to college, the very first thing I did on my first day was introduce myself as “Hi, I’m Angie. I’ve been building websites for fun for a couple of years. Also, I’m queer, so if you’re gonna have a problem with that, it’s probably best we get it out of the way now so we don’t waste each others’ time.” Flash forward to today, my Mom is my biggest supporter, has rainbow stickers all over her car, and has gone to dozens of Pride events. Hacking together HTML snippets in a chat room led to a full-blown career in tech. I gleaned a bit more specificity around my identity and now identify as a homoromantic asexual . Many of those folks I met online as a teenager have become life-long friends. And, I work for a company that embraces people for who they are and celebrates our differences. Life is good. Learn more about Diversity & Inclusion at MongoDB Interested in joining MongoDB? We have several open roles on our teams across the globe and would love for you to transform your career with us!

October 11, 2021

Honoring Hispanic Heritage Month

We’re honoring Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15) in a few ways here at MongoDB! First, hear from three MongoDB employees about their own experiences and what this month means to them. Then, keep scrolling for a Spotify playlist, reading list, and movie list curated by members of our affinity group the Underrepresented People of Color Network (TUPOC). Alicia Raymond , Director, HR Business Partner (Core & Cloud), New York City At 18 years old, and without knowing a word of English, my mother left behind her entire family in Chile to come to the United States. This was in 1973, shortly before the dictator Augusto Pinochet came into power. The following years in Chile were tumultuous and my mother, who was now married to a U.S. military member, relocated frequently. Over time, she lost contact with her family in Chile. Years later, I was a college student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a Morehead-Cain scholarship. The scholarship allowed me to take part in various summer activities, including a summer of studying abroad. Chile was on the list of countries where I could study, so I jumped at the opportunity to go there and find my family. As soon as the plane touched down, I began searching for traces of my family members. This was before the prevalence of social media, so I spent a lot of time sifting through phone books. Finally, I was able to locate a phone number for my mother’s younger sister, Esther, but I didn’t call her right away. I was anxious about how I would fit in with my Chilean relatives. My identity as Latina had always felt a bit nebulous — a common feeling among multiracial, multicultural people and second-generation immigrants. I was Spanglish-speaking and white-passing, and I had not grown up among a Latinx community in the U.S. At the time, I struggled to feel like part of the Latinx community, but I also felt a deep obligation not to abandon the complex mix of identities I inherited from my mother — a mix we are still learning about today. Until recently, she didn’t know she was almost half Indigenous American — a detail her parents hid to improve their chances of integrating into the middle class of Chilean society. Alicia with her mother and aunts from Chile in New York City Eventually, I worked up the courage to make the call. After a few rings of the phone, someone picked up on the other end. I confirmed that it was Esther and then, in broken Spanish, I explained who I was and that I was in Chile. Esther’s excitement melted away all of my concerns. We scheduled a time to meet in person that week, and we have remained in contact ever since. After re-establishing and maintaining contact with my Chilean family, my bonds with my Chilean heritage strengthened. Although my cultural identity still feels complicated, within that complexity lies an incredible blessing. It has given me the opportunity to navigate multiple worlds and be shaped by varied perspectives and communities. That’s not to imply that those identities always meshed in a frictionless way — my father’s parents almost disowned him for marrying my Latina mother — but even that friction helped expand my view of the world. In a career context, this has allowed me to be highly adaptable to new circumstances, adept at perspective-taking, and flexible enough in my own beliefs to understand others’ viewpoints. Those skills are essential for my role as an HR Business Partner, where the issues I face often involve multiple stakeholders, rarely have one right answer, and require a big dollop of creative problem-solving. I am eternally grateful for the multifaceted lens my cultural background has provided me. Alicia's mother as a child, outside the house she grew up in Gustavo Chavez , Senior Solutions Architect, Austin Hispanic Heritage Month is not just a month, it’s a lifestyle! I’m originally from a small town in Mexico and was raised all over the state of Chihuahua. Growing up, I was always fascinated by airplanes and technology, and when I reached high school I had the opportunity to start learning computer programming. My friend’s father owned a payroll-processing company, and he started teaching RPG and COBOL on an IBM System 34 (yeah, I know, I’m dating myself) during the afternoons, so I would go there two or three times a week. This is where my passion for computers and technology really grew and led me to pursue a degree in computer science. After graduating, I began working at a local startup doing offshore work for a mainframe application performance-monitoring company located in Santa Monica, California. The company, Candle Corp, then offered me the opportunity to work for them in the U.S., so my wife and I packed our things in a U-Haul and drove 900 miles west to Los Angeles! IBM acquired Candle Corp in the mid-2000s, which led me to Austin, Texas. After a few years, I had the opportunity to join MongoDB. Diversity is celebrated here, and we all work together toward a common goal while having fun along the way. In my role as a Senior Solutions Architect, I support the LATAM Corporate Sales organization and help align MongoDB technology with customer needs and business goals. My children were born in Los Angeles, where, as an immigrant, I started thinking about my role as a parent in preserving Hispanic language and culture for the next generation. Luckily, it wasn’t too difficult given our location. The shared history between Mexico and the U.S. provides the perfect canvas to paint a picture of blended colors and influences from other places. This is apparent all across Texas and the southwest of our country. The food, architecture, names, battles, and social struggle through the years help build the foundation of what it means to be of Hispanic descent in the United States. We are embedded in the fabric of the region and country, and that is what we aim to share with everybody — our common bonds instead of our differences. Today, as the proud father of two young adults attending university, I can honestly say the job is not done. We still have other generations to share our culture and heritage with. I hope we can ensure that future generations are proud of being Hispanic and proud of the contributions made by members of the Hispanic community to the United States. Gustavo and his family Camilo Velez-Gordon , Field Marketing Specialist, New York City In 2003, my mom and I hopped on a one-way flight from Colombia to Newark International Airport with four suitcases and a lot of unknowns. As a 7-year-old with minimal knowledge of the English language, I had no idea what it meant for me or my future, and I was terrified. My family and I quickly settled in northern New Jersey, and I learned English in less than a year thanks to cartoons and shows such as Rocket Power and Drake and Josh. Throughout my upbringing, I learned that two things will always be true: Family is and always will be an important part of my life, and in the United States you are in control of your destiny, which may not be the case elsewhere. The older I get, the more significance Hispanic Heritage Month has in my life. This may be due to a deeper understanding of the importance of culture and my background. The month is a great opportunity to reflect on my journey to where I am today, and also a good time to educate the people around me about what it is like to be Latino in today’s America. The tech industry has always been fascinating to me, but, while in school, a career in tech always seemed like a far-fetched goal. Through my network, I was fortunate enough to secure a marketing internship for an ad-tech firm while finishing my senior year as a business student at Montclair State University. Once I got my foot in the door, I was determined to take full advantage of the opportunity. To this day, my main takeaway from the process of getting into tech is that mastering the skill of networking will open many doors in your career. As I approach my two-year anniversary at MongoDB, I frequently look back on my journey to where I am today, and I can’t help but smile. The terrified 7-year-old from 17 years ago came a long way. At MongoDB, I continue to grow, evolve, and learn. During my tenure, I have met incredible people, achieved many milestones, and launched multiple global programs that have had a positive impact on the business. I am so proud of how far my family and I have come, and I could not be more excited for what is to come for MongoDB. Camilo and his family Celebrate the Hispanic and Latinx community's contributions to music, literature, and film Spotify Reading list Title Author The House on Mango Street Sandra Cisneros I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter Erika L. Sanchez The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Junot Diaz Dominicana: A Novel Angie Cruz War Against All Puerto Ricans: Revolution and Terror in America's Colony Nelson A. Denis Latinx Superheroes in Mainstream Comics Frederick Luis Aldama Empire's Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism Greg Grandin Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza Gloria Anzaldúa The Borders of Dominicanidad Lorgia Garcia-Peña The Battle for Paradise: Puerto Rico Takes on the Disaster Capitalists Naomi Klein The Arawak: The History and Legacy of the Indigenous Natives in South America and the Caribbean Charles River Editors The Indian Chronicles José Barreiro Eva Luna Isabel Allende The Bronx Evelyn Gonzalez Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos, and the Neoliberal City Arlene Dávila Bodega Dreams Ernesto Quiñonez The Eagle's Throne Carlos Fuentes The Poet X Elizabeth Acevedo When I Was Puerto Rican: A Memoir

October 4, 2021

MongoDB is a Crain's Best Place to Work in NYC for the Fifth Year in a Row

We’re thrilled to announce that MongoDB has made Crain’s 2021 Best Places to Work in New York City list. This is the fifth year in a row that we’ve ranked among Crain’s top 100 companies in New York City, coming in at #29 for 2021. Among large companies specifically, MongoDB ranks #14 out of 47. At MongoDB, we are passionate about our mission of freeing the genius within everyone by making data stunningly easy to work with. This means enabling each individual to pursue their vision, whether they are a developer using our products or an employee. At MongoDB, if you have an idea, you get the trust from leadership and autonomy to run with it while excelling in your role. Every employee can see the direct impact they have on the business and product, as well as the inclusive culture we are building. To drive the personal growth and business impact of our employees, we have committed to developing an open, supportive, and enriching environment for everyone. From meditation sessions and yoga classes to fertility assistance and a generous parental leave policy — the opportunity to make an impact at MongoDB is real and we want to support all of our employees in that journey. It’s important for us to embody our company values, especially when it comes to “Embracing the Power of Differences.” One way we promote this is through our affinity groups , which support our larger commitment to an inclusive community. Our affinity groups provide a collaborative space for employees to mentor and connect with one another through a common interest or identity. In collaboration with our affinity groups, MongoDB supported organizations fighting for racial justice and equal opportunity through a fundraising campaign in 2020. MongoDB pledged $250,000, and through combined efforts with employees and outside contributors, we donated over $330,000 to organizations fighting for justice. While employees have worked from home during COVID-19, we’ve provided telehealth options, mental health support, emergency care leave, company-wide days off, and initiatives to increase social connectivity in a virtual environment. As employees begin to return to our offices, employee health and wellbeing, happiness, and success are of utmost importance to us. We are always striving to make sure that MongoDB is a great place to work for everyone. Hear from some of our New York City employees Marissa Jasso, Product Marketing Manager “As a Latina and Native American in the tech industry, it’s not often I come across a company that makes a consistent effort to ensure all members feel included. To me, that’s a real unicorn company. MongoDB is a deep breath. It’s the relief of knowing that every day, I can bring my whole identity to work.” Paige Jornlin, Manager, Customer Success “MongoDB has an incredible culture. Not only do we have an amazing team that makes me excited to come to work each day, but there are countless growth opportunities and our leaders show so much care for their people. It's truly special. MongoDB is also deeply committed to embracing differences. Without having such a diverse team, we wouldn’t be able to innovate, challenge the norm, or think about different ways of doing things as much as we do.” Blake Deakin, Area VP, Technical Services “We have the opportunity to solve really big, really interesting problems for our customers. There’s a good chance you’ll work on something, see it in the news, and then say, ‘Hey! I helped make that happen.’ For me, that’s one of the most gratifying things about working here.” Interested in joining MongoDB? We have several open roles on our teams across the globe and would love for you to transform your career with us!

September 30, 2021

Sales Development Series: Meet the North America Account Development Team

Sales Development is a crucial part of the Sales organization at MongoDB. Our Sales Development function is broken down into Sales Development Representatives (SDRs), who qualify and validate inbound opportunities from both existing and prospective customers, and Account Development Representatives (ADRs), who support outbound opportunities by planning and executing pipeline generation strategies. Both of these roles offer an excellent path to kickstarting your career in sales at MongoDB. In this blog post, you’ll learn more about our North American outbound team, which is divided into territories covering North America West, North America Central, New York City and the Mid-Atlantic, and New England, East Canada, and the South East. Hear from Regional Manager Jordan Gregory and a few Account Development Representatives about the ADR role and how MongoDB’s sales culture enables employees to grow and succeed in their career. An overview of Account Development in North America Jordan Gregory , Regional Manager of Sales Development for New England, East Canada, and the South East Account Development at MongoDB is crucial to the success of our sales organization, being the first point of contact with all of our prospective customers. We partner with our incredibly talented Enterprise Account Executives to find new business opportunities within some of the largest and most complex organizations in the world across a broad range of industries (financial institutions, video games, telecommunications, insurance - you name it!). The Account Development team culture is one of extreme ownership. It’s about controlling what we can control, building off of each other’s strengths, enjoying working together, and holding ourselves and each other accountable for growing and failing forward every day. If you work hard, you play hard, and that culminates in a lot of fun with this incredible group! MongoDB has a growth-focused culture. Our management and Sales leadership team take learning and development seriously, and the most successful individuals on the Sales team are those who are committed to growing and learning in their role. MongoDB is an open-source data platform company, and I firmly believe that if you can sell an open-source data platform, you can sell anything. This is one of the most challenging places to sell and because of that, and the focus on growth and development, I’ve seen countless people (including myself) take their careers to new heights. The hardest part of sales is prospecting, and it’s something we train our ADRs on extensively. You’ll learn how to identify your Ideal Customer Profile, execute deep discovery and qualification, and progress deals forward to Qualified Pipeline. You’ll also go through our Sales Bootcamp and on-the-job training. Another product of the ADR program is the massive impact we have on revenue which allows folks to build their internal brand and make lifelong connections. On top of that, we have structured upskill programs to set our ADRs up for success in the next role that they’re pursuing internally, whether that's as a Cloud Account Executive, an Associate Account Executive, or other non-direct sales roles like Customer Success and Field Marketing. We’ve also had internal promotions from the Sales Development org to Sales Enablement. At MongoDB, there is a lot of mobility to progress your career in the direction you want, and you’ll be truly valued as a person rather than an employee number or a revenue target. Hear from some team members Andrew Brownlee , Account Development Representative for New York City I joined MongoDB because it seemed like a great place to start my journey to being an Enterprise Sales Executive in the software industry. The people here have a winning mentality and operate as a team when faced with a challenge. The products are world-class and we invest heavily in R&D. MongoDB also has a process called BDR to CRO that’s geared towards developing and promoting sales talent year over year. The most exciting part about working here is the opportunity ahead. To be successful at MongoDB takes conviction, drive, and curiosity. You have to be firm in your opinion that our technology can transform an organization for the best. You must have the drive to push when it's easy, and when it's hard. The best ADRs are focused on being effective with their activity day-to-day and aren't dissuaded by how easy or hard that particular quarter is. Curiosity will help you grow in your career. It’ll also help you get the respect you need amongst your stakeholders. Maria Dorsey , Account Development Representative for North America Central I joined MongoDB because I was looking for a challenging yet rewarding start to my software sales career. It was clear to me throughout the MongoDB interview process that there is a huge emphasis on growth and development which is exactly what I was looking for. During my onboarding, I received a lot of support from my team. Although learning the MongoDB value proposition, products, and sales process can seem overwhelming, my team set aside time to ensure I was ramping up successfully. My manager also took the time to listen to my concerns, talk through tech fundamentals, walk through use cases I was unfamiliar with, and was an ally that I could depend on. What makes me stay at MongoDB is the opportunity for growth, the culture of the Sales Development organization, and the collaboration with enterprise reps and management. I’ve been extremely lucky to learn from and work alongside Enterprise Account Executives, Regional Directors, and my Regional Vice President who all truly care about my growth and success. The biggest thing that makes someone successful as an ADR is their willingness and eagerness to learn. MongoDB doesn’t necessarily care if you come from a software sales background (some of the best ADRs have not), but rather your ability and eagerness to learn the tech, sales process, and stakeholder management. These characteristics are a great foundation for building a long successful career at MongoDB. Vlad Pak , Account Development Representative for North America West I joined MongoDB because I wanted to challenge myself and gain experience working in enterprise sales. MongoDB is an incredible company that offers many opportunities for personal, professional, and financial growth, but the thing that keeps me happy here is the culture. I am surrounded by driven and intelligent teammates and leadership that cares about my success. It's great to be supported from an employee-first perspective. I think the two key traits that make someone successful on my team and in my role are proactiveness and curiosity. Many of our team members are proactively sharing insights, collaborating, and facilitating engagement with each other which benefits us all and drives us to be the best ADRs we can be. Curiosity is the bread and butter of any successful sales professional and will directly impact the quantity and quality of the meetings we set, helping us attain our quotas! I am looking forward to growing my career with MongoDB in a closing role and taking on the challenge of owning my own sales cycle. It’s exciting to work for a company that is leading the charge in digital transformation and changing the way enterprises approach technological innovation. It has been a great learning experience so far, and I can’t wait to see how the organization will grow and evolve along with my career! Interested in joining the sales team at MongoDB? We have several open roles on our team and would love for you to transform your career with us!

September 27, 2021

From Solutions Architect to Enterprise Account Executive: How Julian Storz is Growing His Career at MongoDB

MongoDB empowers employees to transform their careers by growing in the direction they want. One of the ways we do this is through our many internal transfer opportunities. Hear from Julian Storz about his transfer from Solutions Architect to Enterprise Account Executive and how he became the inspiration behind the MongoDB Lego person along the way. Jackie Denner: Thanks for sharing your story with me, Julian. To start, how did you come to join MongoDB? Julian Storz: I worked at a management consulting firm in the financial services industry before joining MongoDB. By chance, I was invited to a wine tasting in 2018 where I got to know Anton Rau, Regional Director at MongoDB, who was an Enterprise Account Executive at the time. We had an interesting conversation about current trends in the market, technologies that he saw emergings, and MongoDB not only as a technology but also as a company. I was familiar with MongoDB from my studies, loved the technology for its simplicity, and knew that they had IPOed recently, but I wasn’t thinking about a role in tech back then. Consulting and banking was what I learned and knew; thus I did not fully comprehend the potential of a career in the tech sector. Anton and I met again a month later, and by then I had done further research on the business model and took some time to ramp up my knowledge on the current state of MongoDB’s technology. During our second meeting, I agreed to kick off conversations and later accepted a Solutions Architect role within the Presales organization at MongoDB. This marked the starting point for an incredible journey at the company. JD: Tell me about your journey from presales to sales. JS: The main driver for me joining MongoDB was the technology. I always enjoyed programming and entrepreneurship. As part of the Presales team, a Solutions Architect is responsible for guiding our customers and users to design and build reliable, scalable systems using MongoDB. In this role I worked closely with one of our Enterprise Account Executives, Oliver Wedell. We paired up as a team for the Accounts in southwest Germany along with Austria and Switzerland, working on big deals with clients. This teamwork provided me with a profound insight into the sales role. After one and a half years as a Solutions Architect, I decided to make the move into Sales. JD: Why did you decide to make this move from presales into sales? JS: My role as a Solutions Architect also provided me the opportunity to work with many additional sales representatives from different regions, learning about their styles and approaches. I fell in love with the idea of building a business from the ground up and learning how to develop customer relationships by solving their problems systematically. In essence, the role of an Account Executive at MongoDB is one of a real businessperson. You are in charge of your franchise. You have a vast number of topics you can address with the technology, and it comes down to understanding the customer’s business, the current situation they are facing, and how MongoDB can add value for them. I’ve realized that it’s similar to working in consulting. The difference is that it’s not about services, but a product solution. After one and a half years as a Solutions Architect, I decided that I wanted to take the opportunity to learn the sales craft and gain the knowledge of all the inspiring people who are part of the Sales organization at MongoDB. My motivation behind this is to take the knowledge I’ve gathered and help smaller companies grow their businesses in the future. The complexity of growing an organization effectively requires a mindset that I feel can be improved upon in Germany. I am very thankful for this opportunity and the ability to tackle a new challenge. JD: What training was provided to you to help you transfer from a presales to a sales role? JS: During my transition period I received very close coaching from our Regional Directors. They supported me in analyzing my accounts, defining sales campaigns, identifying the right targets, training my pitches, and organization. At the same time, Oliver was promoted into a Regional Director role and became my manager, so I was thrilled that we would continue to work together. On top of that, the Central Europe team has weekly sessions organized by our Regional Vice President and the Leadership team to address specific areas of development for the whole Central Europe organization to allow for continuous development. JD: I hear that you’ve recently played a role in one of our field marketing campaigns. What's the story behind the MongoDB Lego set? JS: The MongoDB Lego set was part of a regional field marketing campaign for Germany, Austria, and Switzerland (DACH). The purpose was to promote MongoDB Atlas and its multi-cloud clusters, which enables a single application to use multiple clouds. The campaign was a raffle in which you could enter to win one of the 33 Lego sets MongoDB designed. I have always collaborated closely with our Marketing team, speaking at global and local events such as MongoDB World, webinars, and meetups. When the Marketing team decided to create this Lego set, they wanted a figure that people could relate to. It seems like this was my reward for almost two years of great collaboration because they decided to model the Lego person after me! JD: Tell me a bit about your team and culture. JS: One of the reasons I joined MongoDB initially was that it is all about personal growth and performance. The company culture is very open-minded and goal-oriented, which comes with a strong focus on development. As a team, we understand nobody is perfect and that we can all learn from each other, so this is what we do! We have weekly calls sharing our experiences, reflecting on how we can become better and deepening our knowledge on our sales processes and approaches to ensure that we can serve our customers effectively. During COVID-19 things have been different. We used to do a lot as a team and met at least once a week in-person. This obviously was not possible anymore. We adapted to remote work by having digital team events and working together via Zoom. As of July 2021, things are gladly easing up in Germany which means we can begin meeting face to face again! JD: Why should someone want to join your team? What would you like a candidate to know about life at MongoDB? JS: If you are interested in technology, like working with people, enjoy problem solving, and want to grow, MongoDB is a remarkable place to be. It may not always be easy, but it is more than worth it! The best part is that we have an outstanding leadership team, strong growth and market opportunity, and an open-minded culture - the perfect soil to plant the seed to a stellar career. Interested in pursuing a career at MongoDB? We have several open roles on our teams across the globe and would love for you to transform your career with us!

August 25, 2021

The Future is Inclusive: Meet The Queer Collective, MongoDB's Affinity Group for the LGBTQIA+ Community & Allies

MongoDB affinity groups are employee-led resource groups that bring together employees with similar backgrounds, interests, or goals. They play an important role in our company and culture. Our affinity groups build community and connections, help us raise awareness of issues unique to members’ experiences, and offer networking and professional development opportunities. I sat down with some of the leaders of The Queer Collective to learn more about their initiatives, impact, and plans for the future. What is The Queer Collective? The Queer Collective is a member-based group working towards equality in the workplace and beyond. We envision a workplace atmosphere in which everyone feels comfortable bringing their full selves to work, regardless of gender identity, gender expression, race, religion, age, or sexual preference. We aim to champion LGBTQIA+ rights in the workplace, provide a space for queer people and allies to meet, encourage an open exchange of thoughts, organize impactful events, and provide education and networking opportunities to individuals who would like to learn more. The Queer Collective is open to LGBTQIA+ and allies and complements our closed employee affinity group, Queeries, which provides a safe space for queer-identifying employees. The Queer Collective is open to all MongoDB employees who would like to join. How did The Queer Collective get started, and how has the group grown? In early 2020, the Dublin Workplace team decided to organize activities for a virtual Pride celebration throughout the month of June. This was an ambitious idea that required a collective of people, so a call for volunteers was sent out. By the end of May of 2020, seven people offered help, and in the end, it became a huge success. The same seven volunteers decided to keep working on evolving these initiatives, and that's when The Queer Collective was officially born. We realized that raising awareness and sharing knowledge with the community (both the LGBTQIA+ and ally communities) couldn’t be accomplished in just one month, and so The Queer Collective formed into an ongoing initiative. The most fun part of forming any group is naming it. There were multiple ideas, but the one that stuck the most was a pun of sorts. It combines both the collection of documents in a database and the LGBTQIA + community: The Queer Collective. We are now almost 200 members globally and can't believe how much we've grown in just a year. As we continue to grow, we hope to start regional chapters so that our planning and programming can evolve on a global scale. What types of initiatives does The Queer Collective organize? We organize a range of social, educational, and awareness events. Over the past year, these have included (Inter)national Coming Out Day , Transgender Awareness Week, Pride Month programming, Zero-Discrimination Day in partnership with MDBWomen, and smaller events such as happy hours and Drag Bingo. This year and for the first time ever, we are a top-tier sponsor for the Lesbians Who Tech Summit, the largest & most diverse tech event in the world! As we continue to grow and diversify, we have partnered with MongoDB’s Learning and Development team to develop training on managing and supporting LGBTQIA+ employees and colleagues. We’ve also begun developing programs on intersectional thinking to help leaders, managers, and other colleagues understand the importance of intersectionality in the workplace. How has participating in The Queer Collective impacted some of our employees? The Queer Collective has provided visibility to members of the LGBTQIA+ community and the amazing allies that support us. Some of The Queer Collective’s leads have been approached for advice and support by members of the LGBTQIA+ community who are coming to terms with their own sexuality or gender expression, as well as colleagues looking for a supportive corporate structure in which to be themselves. Awareness initiatives have impacted how many people view the LGBTQIA+ community, providing an opportunity for people from different backgrounds and cultures to learn about the lived experiences of LGBTQIA+ individuals by listening to their stories. Hear from one of our members to learn more about the impact The Queer Collective has had on our allies. The Joy of Being an Ally in The Queer Collective Community Diana Balaci (She/Her), Workplace Manager, Paris “I am the Workplace Manager for MongoDB’s Southern European offices and a very proud ally of the LQBTQIA+ community. Allies help to support, uplift, and amplify the voices of others, and I humbly feel that I learn something new every day alongside the wonderful humans that are part of The Queer Collective.” “To understand my activism is to know my story. I come from Romania, an ex-communist country. I was born in Bucharest and lived in a big industrial and university city in the southwest of the country until I was 24 years old. In my family, I was taught values like tolerance and supporting differences early on. All the while we were still living under very conservative, traditional society patterns. My upbringing, combined with my choice of attire and value for art, culture, and universality made me pivot towards the extremely few and timid queer people in my hometown. In a time when the word ‘gay’ was not even spoken publicly, I witnessed the bullying and ignorant labeling of my best friend. Defending him started a wave of questions and pointing of fingers, questions that I am honest to say I did not know how to respond to. I promised myself then and there that I would continuously do my best in growing and learning more about the LQBTQIA+ community. Fast forward to now, my friend is happily engaged and in a loving, fulfilling relationship with the man of his dreams in a more open-minded Bucharest. As for me, I’m still educating myself and those around me.” “I am thankful for the opportunity to meet amazing people through The Queer Collective who have such complex personalities that truly value inclusivity and diversity. They embraced the weird, loud, outspoken person that I am. I am in awe when I see the efforts they make to give a voice to everyone, and I am humbled and touched when I see them sparing their time to make sure that events are safe, accessible, and welcoming to every identity. I am honored to be in this community.” What has been The Queer Collective's biggest highlight so far? We launched an incredibly ambitious program for Pride 2021, including both fun and educational events organized by our members all across the world. The schedule included educational training, voguing workshops, drag events, a trans experience fireside chat, a U.S. benefits webinar discussing fertility and family-forming, virtual happy hours, and more. Pride 2021 kick-off drag event with Cissy Walken Our biggest hope is that our Pride programming advocates for inclusivity, educates about respect, and celebrates the wonderful complexity of the human experience. We believe this is the best spotlight so far as it includes multiple events over the month of June. Some past events that have also been impactful are (Inter)national Coming Out Day 2020 and the Trans Awareness Panels hosted the same year. The first emphasized the life experiences of LGBTQIA+ members in The Queer Collective, and the latter focused on the trans color in the LGBTQIA+ rainbow: educating participants to see the transgender identity, to understand it and, most importantly, to respect it. Respect is highly cherished by all members of The Queer Collective and is the foundation of all our actions. From gender pronoun forums, to book club discussions, to learning and development training, our goal is to support and educate others about all identities. “I see you and I respect who you are” may be easily said on paper, but it takes real effort to turn it into actions in your everyday life. What are Queer Collective's goals and plans for the future? We are delighted to announce that we have partnered with Ryan Francis , Vice President of Worldwide Demand Generation & Field Marketing, to be our executive sponsor. Ryan’s support will help us grow, amplify our message, and enable our voices to be heard in spaces we don’t have access to. While it is a commitment, we are excited to see where this partnership will take us. Ryan had this to say: “I accepted the invitation to be the executive sponsor for The Queer Collective to do more for my community here at MongoDB. It's easy to forget in the rush of Zoom calls, deadlines, and fire drills that I'm incredibly lucky to be in the position I'm in, and it's because of the people who have done the work before me that I am. It's the least I can do to create visibility for my community and support them to the fullest extent.” The next step for us is to foster intersectional cooperation with other MongoDB affinity groups. We have worked quite closely with Queeries, the closed group for queer folks at MongoDB. We admire the work of MDBWomen , The Underrepresented People of Color Network, MongoDB Veterans, and Underrepresented Genders in Tech, and we recognize that true inclusion, equality, and equity is only achieved through intersectionality. We intend to partner closely with these groups and any emerging affinity groups. Everyone exists at the intersection of multiple identities and labels, and we need to be mindful that The Queer Collective member identities are multi-faceted and complex. We also hope to collaborate with other teams and departments at MongoDB with a focus on working together to solve for equity across the business. What do we mean by that? There are nuances in ways of working across teams. The Sales team works in a very different way and has a different set of priorities than, for example, the Product or Engineering teams. We want everyone at MongoDB to benefit from an inclusive culture and welcoming environment. No matter your role, you should feel safe, welcome, and supported in bringing your full self to work at MongoDB. Finally, we’re working on developing partnerships externally so that the work we do extends beyond MongoDB. This began with our sponsorship of the 2021 Lesbians Who Tech Summit and we also have an upcoming talk at MongoDB .Live on allyship which will be given by two of our leads. We hope to continue sponsoring more conferences, speaking at more events, and lending our knowledge to other groups. Meet our current Queer Collective leads Interested in pursuing a career at MongoDB and joining The Queer Collective? We have several open roles on our teams across the globe and would love for you to transform your career with us!

June 29, 2021

Why It's an Exciting Time to Join MongoDB's Expanding Australian Location

Although MongoDB is headquartered in New York City, our company has offices spanning the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia-Pacific. MongoDB is currently made up of more than 2,900 employees, and we are continuing to grow. One location experiencing expansion is Australia. Established in 2012, our Australian team is spread across our offices in Sydney and Melbourne, or remote throughout the country. In this spotlight, team members share what life is like at MongoDB in Australia and why it’s an exciting time to join. An overview of MongoDB Australia The teams based in Australia currently include Storage Engines, MongoDB Charts, Technical Services, Professional Services, Solutions Architecture, Human Resources, Marketing, Sales, MongoDB Labs, Customer Success, Developer Relations, and more. We’ll continue to build out new teams as MongoDB grows, and the opportunities in Australia will grow along with it. Katie Mapstone , Principal Recruiter, Sydney “Our teams in Australia are still small enough that employees can see the direct impact and contribution of their work. At the same time, we’re big enough that there are clear paths for professional growth and development, whether within your team or into others.” “You’re not just a cog in the wheel here, and you have a lot of autonomy and opportunity to take initiative in your role. This is a good atmosphere for those who like the freedom to create because you also have the global support of an established company. It’s a great opportunity to work at an innovative organisation where what you do really matters.” Despite MongoDB’s size, the Australian team gets the best of both worlds: a tight-knit, small-company vibe with the benefits, resources, and support of a larger, more evolved organisation. Some benefits for our Australian team members include: Above-standard 25 days of annual leave. More than 20 weeks of company-sponsored, fully paid parental leave, family planning benefits, and parental counselling support. Generous contribution toward company health insurance plan, ranging between $3,000 (single) and $7,600 (family) per year, depending on the level of coverage chosen. Income protection, life cover, and total permanent disability insurance. A generous equity and employee stock purchase program. Ongoing local and global company initiatives to support physical and mental well-being, including mental health resources, a free subscription to Headspace, gym benefits, and an employee-assistance program. Free lunches two days a week (when the team is in the office). Joey Zhang , Director of Employee Experience for APAC, India, and New Markets “At MongoDB, our goal is to create opportunities that enable employees to learn, develop, and fulfill their potential. We encourage everyone to follow their career interests and fully support transitions across teams and functions. We invest in our people for the long term through truly awesome technical and professional learning and development opportunities, including internal online learning, external coaching, workshops and accreditations, and more. Employees will openly share knowledge and experience, both work and personal, with others who may be seeking guidance or support.” “Diversity and inclusion also play a big role. People feel safe and encouraged to share their opinion, and they consider everyone else’s needs and feelings when an event is to be hosted or a decision is to be made. The sense of belonging, pride, and close-knit feeling here is significant.” The Sydney office and team culture Our largest office in Australia is in the heart of Sydney’s Chinatown, a short walk from Central and Town Hall train stations. As vibrant as the city around it, our office is just minutes from the Darling Harbour and the new Darling Quarter and Darling Square, offering a spoil of some of the best restaurants in town. For the sports-minded, there are gyms, yoga studios, and an aquatic centre within walking distance. When the team was working in-office, the Workplace team organised monthly and annual events, such as wellness seminars and cultural celebrations. We also had activities such as paint nights, ping-pong tournaments, a running group, and themed parties. The pandemic posed an interesting challenge, with the majority of our employees working remotely. The team has adapted some in-office activities to ensure everyone feels connected, though, including remote lunches, trivia nights, virtual team activity challenges, workshops, cook-alongs, and more. Thomas Rueckstiess , Staff Engineer for MongoDB Labs “I’ve worked at MongoDB for almost nine years, and I’ve been provided with interesting challenges and career opportunities. I started in Support, then went on a six-month secondment to the New York headquarters as Program Manager, and finally returned to Sydney to start the Compass team and later the Charts team. Recently, I moved from a Lead to a Staff Engineer role and joined our research division, MongoDB Labs. The internal mobility available to employees is fantastic.” “One thing that makes working at MongoDB in Australia special is the team culture. I felt welcomed from day one, back in 2012 when we had only five employees in Australia. I’m glad to say we’ve been able to maintain the friendly, welcoming experience even while growing close to 100 employees in the Sydney office alone. Many of us have become close friends over the years. Before COVID-19, we regularly had barbecues or dinners together, played board games after work, or went for a run in the morning. The pandemic made seeing one another in person difficult, but the social connections remained. Now we play games online, have virtual drinks on Friday afternoons, and informally chat over Zoom and Slack throughout the day. The team here is extremely supportive and inclusive, and we’re always looking for ways to share knowledge and help one another.” Stephen Steneker , Director of Community “I’ve personally had great opportunities at MongoDB, and I really enjoy working with my colleagues. My first seven years were in the Technical Services organisation, and my responsibilities grew to a global scope while remaining based in Australia. I moved into a role in Developer Relations in September 2019, and two of my team members joined me — we’ve worked together for more than five years now.” “I recently took on an expanded role as Director of Community, leading our global DevRel community team, which includes engineering, triage, and community programs such as Champions and User Groups. I find the leadership support, alignment, and trust in our global team inspiring and highly motivational.” “The company growth has been tremendous, but I think we have done well scaling one of the harder aspects: company culture. Our six company values are top of mind and given consideration in how we recognize employees and collaborate.” Our Australian team gathers for in-person events prior to COVID-19. Meet some of our Australian teams Core development teams: MongoDB Charts and Storage Engines Alex Gorrod , Director of Engineering “The original Storage Engines team joined by way of WiredTiger, MongoDB’s first acquisition in December 2014 . At the time, I was working at WiredTiger as a software engineer. We had been developing an eponymous open source storage engine for several years, which provided high performance and scalability on modern hardware. At the time of acquisition, we were working on an integration with MongoDB’s new pluggable storage API, which would add distributed database architecture (networking, replication, sharding) that was complementary to WiredTiger’s single-server storage engine. This powerful combination would become key to the future of the core MongoDB server. The WiredTiger storage engine debuted as an alternative configuration option in MongoDB 3.0, and became the default storage engine for new deployments in MongoDB 3.2.” “Half the original WiredTiger development team was based in Sydney and integrated into the local office, which helped establish the Australian contribution to MongoDB’s global Engineering organisation, including ongoing innovative research and development. More than six years later, all the local team members who joined are still working at MongoDB. The team has collaborated with our global Engineering team to plan and deliver innovative new features such as distributed multidocument ACID transactions, which is a multiyear engineering effort.” Tom Hollander , Lead Product Manager for Charts “ MongoDB Charts is one of the pillars of the MongoDB Cloud platform, allowing users to quickly create charts, graphs, and tables from any data stored in a MongoDB Atlas database. The Charts product began its life in 2017, when it was incubated as an extension to another MongoDB product called Compass . At the time, the Compass team was split over three continents, and when the decision was made to spin off Charts as a new product it was clear there would be benefits to choosing a primary geography for each team.” “Sydney was chosen as the new home for Charts, and the team has since grown tremendously. Software development is a team sport, and having all key roles represented in Australia makes it easy to collaborate and build a strong team culture. We still frequently work with teams in other geographies, but our relative isolation is often a major plus that allows us to get stuff done without too many distractions. I feel very lucky to work for a global software company delivering one of its core products, all from the comfort of Australia.” Sales team Francesca Ruygrok , Strategic Account Manager, Australia/New Zealand “When I started at MongoDB, I was looking after 10 accounts. As our customers have grown their usage and we have expanded our team, I have been offered the opportunity to focus on two strategic accounts. MongoDB has such a strong reputation in the market, not just for our product suite, but also our leadership and go-to-market strategy. The education, coaching, and playbook you receive here will change your career for the rest of your life. Our product delivers tangible value to our clients. To work for a sales team and with customers where there is constant success is such a positive working environment to be in.” Ed Liao , Corporate Account Executive, Australia/New Zealand “My MongoDB career growth has been extraordinary. I started as a Sales Development Representative supporting the U.S. and Latin America markets. After my promotion to senior, I was approached to pilot new efforts and became the first dedicated SDR for the Australia/New Zealand region. Through this incredible opportunity, I built a new sales development model from scratch and permanently relocated from Austin, Texas, to Sydney. I then began running midmarket deals, and, after much success, I was promoted to be the first Corporate Account Executive in the region. There are more than enough career growth opportunities here, and, from a sales perspective, ANZ is a largely untapped market for modern database technology.” “What really keeps me at MongoDB is our team culture and focus on learning and development. Our sales leader and Regional VP, Jeremy Powers, wants all of us to succeed, even if it means failing a few times before we start to see results so we can truly learn and improve ourselves. The team camaraderie is also tangible — even if I do well with my numbers, I won’t feel successful if the whole team isn’t. MongoDB will give you the responsibility and trust to own what you do and allow you to grow your career at a highly accelerated pace. It’s truly an amazing time for someone to join our sales team here in ANZ.” Customer Success team Leanna Lewis , Senior Customer Success Manager, APAC “When I joined MongoDB in 2019, the Customer Success program was already well-established, but it turns out we were just getting started. Since I joined as the first Customer Success Manager outside of North America and Dublin, CS has quadrupled in size globally, and now there are multiple streams of CS ensuring our customers get the most out of MongoDB, whether they are entrepreneurial startups or a global enterprise. I love how my team strategically partners with customers and has the freedom to be flexible and creative in their approach to ensure each customer gets what they need to be successful.” “The true joy in my role is knowing I play a key part in customers’ ongoing growth and success. We get to solve real business problems and will continue to do so as MongoDB quickly evolves to meet our customers’ needs. I deliberately changed my career path from sales because I was motivated by knowing I could have a direct impact on helping customers grow. MongoDB is changing the face of the database industry, and our company culture and the incredible amount MongoDB invests in our employees in terms of training and benefits is the best I have experienced — but my colleagues are what really makes MongoDB an amazing place to work.” Technical Services team André de Frere , VP of Technical Services, APAC “The Technical Services team uses a follow-the-sun process to ensure our customers are always supported, no matter the time of day. It makes sense for Australia — and the counterpart offices in APAC — to be part of the unbroken chain of support we offer our customers. Because of time zones and geography, our daytime means we are able to work through the hours that would otherwise be very difficult for our international customers. That means we have a big impact, especially when our customers need help outside their usual office hours, which usually means help on the most urgent issues. I think the main thing about the work itself is the challenge and reward. It’s truly unlike any support organisation I’ve worked in or interacted with, and we get regular positive feedback from our customers telling us so. The team is motivated to solve interesting problems, and we work on a fast-moving technology stack with some of the world’s biggest companies. There is a lot of opportunity for our team, both in growing more technical and developing our leadership.” “MongoDB has offered me huge career opportunities. I went from Technical Services Engineer (TSE) to Senior TSE to Team Lead to Director, and now I’m an Area Vice President. The number one reason I stay, however, is the opportunity I’ve been given to work with some truly great people. We’ve built an exceptional team at MongoDB, and it has been so amazing to see how we’ve grown in Australia over the past nine years. The thing I feel most fortunate for is seeing all the people who I’ve worked with grow within MongoDB, both inside and outside Technical Services.” Interested in pursuing a career at MongoDB in Australia? We have several open roles on our team and would love for you to transform your career with us!

June 22, 2021

Solving Customer Challenges: Meet Consulting Engineer Paul-Emile Brotons

Our Professional Services team is growing. Hear from Paul-Emile Brotons about his Consulting Engineer (CE) role, the types of projects he works on for customers, how he continually learns, and what makes this role a great opportunity for people with technical backgrounds who enjoy solving a variety of problems. Jackie Denner: Thanks for sharing your experience as a Consulting Engineer. Can you tell me about the Consulting Engineer team within Professional Services at MongoDB? Paul-Emile Brotons: I joined MongoDB a year and a half ago. The Consulting Engineering team is responsible for assisting customers at every stage of their MongoDB journey to ensure they are successful. We assist customers with training, database design, architecture design, code reviews, preproduction audits and reviews, setup, and health checks. I’m part of the South European team and I’m based out of Paris, but the Consulting Engineering team is worldwide. Since we are solving challenging problems, the team is very close and meets daily to share ideas and discuss solutions. I always have colleagues available to help at any time of day. JD: As a junior engineer, why did you opt for a Consulting Engineer role instead of a traditional Product Engineer role? PEB: Before joining MongoDB, I was a full-stack engineer at a French startup specializing in revenue management. I learned great technical skills there, but, in the end, I felt I was missing the big picture: What other stacks exist on the market? What tools are other engineering teams at big companies or startups working with? That is exactly what the Consulting Engineer role made possible for me. Since our projects are usually short-term, a typical CE may see 50 projects in a year. In my current role, I have been working with almost every new and exciting technology. I also get to learn how people within product and engineering work in other organizations. I find this very valuable, and it’s not something you can easily find in a traditional Product Engineer role. JD: What does a day in your role look like? PEB: CEs are assigned to “missions,” which typically range from one to four days and concern a specific customer. Longer-term projects can span several months. My role generally starts the week before. Before each mission, I try to set up a short preconsult session where I meet with customers and discover the topics they want to discuss. Then, on the day of the mission, I provide training, performance evaluation, tuning, and more. I learn a lot in my role, and I try to find solutions to all the difficult problems the customer has not been able to solve alone. It’s challenging and very rewarding. In some cases, I may not be assigned to a customer and I will be working on preparation and continuous learning. I appreciate the liberty my role gives me. JD: What was your onboarding like, and what learning and growth opportunities are there on the Consulting Engineer team? PEB: To be completely honest, I was a bit scared when I joined. I was very impressed with the way people work here, and I had a feeling it would be hard for me to onboard. However, the ramp-up process is so well-done that it almost felt easy. The first weeks were dedicated only to training. First, we have to learn a lot about MongoDB. A CE is a database expert. Since almost every software needs a persistent layer, this expertise is very valuable. Second, we have to know our stuff when it comes to Linux, networking, cloud providers, architecture, coding, and more. Afterward, everything is done to gradually increase the level of difficulty; complex missions are not delivered by new hires. Management is really careful about that, which is reassuring. Once a CE is performing well in their role, they may be promoted to Senior and then Principal grades. Many of us also study to pass certifications. I will soon start studying for a Linux sysadmin certification. The management team is very supportive and encourages continuous learning. JD: How do you interact with other teams at MongoDB? PEB: The CE role requires a lot of interaction with teams such as Sales, Presales Engineering, and Product Engineering. Consulting Engineers can be leveraged to help Sales and Solution Architects before the sale happens, since we are seen as trusted advisers. We also often speak to product teams to discuss the inner workings of a product, feature, or system. I’ve had the opportunity to meet many people within MongoDB. JD: What is one of the most interesting or challenging projects you’ve worked on? PEB: It is honestly difficult to choose, but I would pick a long project I worked on with a major container transportation and shipping company. It was challenging given the scope of the project and the number of interactions and subjects I had to deal with. The project was key for the customer, and it was technically demanding. We had to review the whole application architecture; analyze the front end to infer the requests and schema design needed on the database side; work with a wide range of professionals, including developers, solution architects, Linux engineers, and project managers; and test that everything would happen as expected. It was a great learning experience, from both a personal and professional perspective. JD: What makes someone successful in a CE role? PEB: Aside from sufficient knowledge of computer science, the CE role requires good communication and problem-solving skills. You have to know how to listen to and understand the problems customers encounter before you can think of a solution. Good customer contact is often the key to a mission’s success, and it makes the difference between a satisfied customer and a happy customer. JD: What advice would you offer someone looking to move into Professional Services at MongoDB? PEB: First, prepare well for the interviews — study up on algorithms, two programming languages, and basic database and hardware concepts. The interviews can be challenging, and there are a lot of rounds. Second, I would advise candidates to look at the beginners course on the MongoDB University website. The courses are free and they’re the best I have done on the web so far. Going deeper into learning MongoDB before joining the company saved me a lot of time. Last but not least, I would encourage candidates to contact CEs at MongoDB to get a clear view of the company and the role. My colleagues and I are more than happy to answer any questions that might help someone decide if this role is the right fit for them. Interested in a Professional Services career at MongoDB? We have several open roles on our team and would love for you to transform your career with us!

June 10, 2021