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Configure Audit Logs

On this page

  • Required Access
  • Enable Audit Logs
  • Configure a Custom Auditing Filter

Note

  • This feature is not available for M0 free clusters, M2, and M5 clusters. To learn more, see Atlas M0 (Free Cluster), M2, and M5 Limits.

  • This feature is not supported on Serverless instances at this time. To learn more, see Serverless Instance Limitations.

You can use Atlas Kubernetes Operator to configure audit logs. To learn more, see Set Up Database Auditing.

Database auditing lets administrators track system activity for deployments with multiple users. Atlas administrators can select the actions, database users, Atlas roles, and LDAP groups that they want to audit. Atlas supports auditing most of the documented system event actions, with the following limitations:

  • When an Atlas user performs an action in the Atlas UI on a cluster, both the audit logs and mongodb.log file log the mms-automation database user as the user performing the auditable action. However, the Project Activity Feed logs the actual username of the Atlas user responsible for the action.

  • The Atlas audit logs don't track user creation or modification events because Atlas performs these operations directly in the admin database.

Important

Performing a Full Database Audit

Due to these noted limitations, you must use a combination of audit logs, the mongodb.log, and the Project Activity Feed to perform a full audit.

The authCheck event action logs authorization attempts by users trying to read from and write to databases in the clusters in your project. Atlas audits the following specific commands:

authCheck Reads
authCheck Writes
aggregate
[1](1, 2, 3) MongoDB versions 4.2 and later don't support these commands.

Atlas implements the authCheck event action as the following four separate actions:

Event Action
Description
authChecksReadFailures
authCheck event action for all failed reads with the auditAuthorizationSuccess parameter set to false. This event action is the default for read-related event actions.
authChecksReadAll

authCheck event action for all reads, both sucesses and failures. This event action is the same as authChecksReadFailures, but with the auditAuthorizationSuccess parameter set to true.

Warning

If you enable auditAuthorizationSuccess, you might severely impact cluster performance. Enable this option with caution.

authChecksWriteFailures
authCheck event action for all failed writes with the auditAuthorizationSuccess parameter set to false. This event action is the default for write-related event actions.
authChecksWriteAll

authCheck event action for all writes, both successes and failures. This event action is the same as authChecksWriteFailures, but with the auditAuthorizationSuccess parameter set to true.

Warning

If you enable auditAuthorizationSuccess, you might severely impact cluster performance. Enable this option with caution.

To learn about how MongoDB writes audit events to disk, see Audit Guarantee in the MongoDB Manual.

To configure audit logs, you must have Project Owner access to the project that you want to update or Organization Owner access to the organization that contains the project that you want to update.

Note

To learn about best practices for auditing the actions of temporary database users, see Audit Temporary Database Users.

To enable audit logs, set spec.auditing.enabled to true in the AtlasProject Custom Resource.

Example:

cat <<EOF | kubectl apply -f -
apiVersion: atlas.mongodb.com/v1
kind: AtlasProject
metadata:
name: my-project
spec:
name: TestAuditing
connectionSecretRef:
name: my-atlas-key
projectIpAccessList:
- cidrBlock: "0.0.0.0/1"
comment: "Everyone has access. For test purposes only."
- cidrBlock: "128.0.0.0/1"
comment: "Everyone has access. For test purposes only."
auditing:
enabled: true
EOF

To retrieve the audit logs in Atlas, see MongoDB Logs. To retrieve the audit logs using the API, see Logs.

Note

Atlas supports specifying a JSON-formatted audit filter for customizing MongoDB Auditing.

Custom audit filters lets users forgo the managed Atlas UI auditing filter builder in favor of hand-tailored granular control of event auditing. Atlas checks only that the custom filter uses valid JSON syntax, and doesn't validate or test the filter's functionality.

The audit filter document must resolve to a query that matches one or more fields in the audit event message. The filter document can use combinations of query operators and equality conditions to match the desired audit messages.

To view example auditing filters, see Example Auditing Filters. To learn more about configuring MongoDB auditing filters, see Configure Audit Filter.

Important

Atlas uses a rolling upgrade strategy for enabling or updating audit configuration settings across all clusters in the Atlas project. Rolling upgrades require at least one election per replica set.

To learn more about testing application resilience to replica set elections, see /tutorial/test-resilience/test-primary-failover. To learn more about how Atlas provides high availability, see Atlas High Availability.

To configure a custom auditing filter, specify the spec.auditing.auditFilter setting in the AtlasProject Custom Resource. To specify a value for this setting, you must set spec.auditing.enabled to true.

Example:

cat <<EOF | kubectl apply -f -
apiVersion: atlas.mongodb.com/v1
kind: AtlasProject
metadata:
name: my-project
spec:
name: TestAuditing
connectionSecretRef:
name: my-atlas-key
projectIpAccessList:
- cidrBlock: "0.0.0.0/1"
comment: "Everyone has access. For test purposes only."
- cidrBlock: "128.0.0.0/1"
comment: "Everyone has access. For test purposes only."
auditing:
enabled: true
auditFilter: "{"atype": "authenticate"}"
EOF

To learn more about the configuration parameters available from the API, see the Atlas Auditing.

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