Sara Naouai

5 results

Intern Spotlight: Josh Clapper

This summer, MongoDB welcomed 33 university students to our intern program in Engineering, Marketing, and Education. In this series, we'll introduce you to the talented students who are helping us transform development and operations for how we run applications today. I had the chance to sit down with Josh Clapper who spent the summer working with the Marketing team! Where do you go to school, what is your major, and what year are you in? I go to Yale University, majoring in Global Affairs and American Studies. I’m a rising junior, planning to graduate in 2016. What is your role at MongoDB? I work in Corporate Marketing, especially focusing on our partner ecosystem. How did you find out about the internship program at MongoDB? Why did you choose to come to MongoDB? I worked last summer at Crowdtap, a collaborative marketing platform based here in New York, and heard about MongoDB through some of my coworkers who knew about the company. When I was looking at where to work this summer, I submitted an application to MongoDB because the company had had a lot of success but was still small; I wanted to learn more about that environment. What’s your hometown? My hometown is Coronado, CA. Bike or public transportation to work? Subway or walking, depending on how much time I have and the weather. What’s a typical day (or week) for you? Typically I’ll get to work and see what projects I’m involved in for that particular day. I’ve been helping in product marketing, corporate communications, and community. What do you love most about MongoDB? I love the family of people who work here and the global sense of that family within the company and in the broader community of MongoDB users. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? I think the most challenging part is getting up to speed with everything MongoDB does. There’s a unique challenge every department works with. I've felt challenged every week I've been here, and it's been a big professional growth experience. What’s your favorite Seamless lunch order? Getting sandwiches from any of the American restaurants that cycle through the list, maybe with a little barbecue sauce mixed in. Name one secret skill you have, unrelated to work. I’m really good at remembering scenes from movies or TV shows. It’s a pretty useful secret skill. How do you like New York City? As someone from Southern California, the high usage of public transit is definitely something to get used to. The scene for technology companies here is really interesting; I’ve enjoyed learning and growing up in it. There’s also a kind of classic experience to the city, where each neighborhood comes to represent a phase of life. Kindle or book? What’s your favorite book? Book but the Kindle is growing on me. My favorite book is Joan Didion’s essay collection “Slouching Towards Bethlehem,” and right now I’m reading Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War, by former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. Describe your perfect weekend. The perfect weekend would probably start with dinner at a friend’s apartment, maybe a party afterwards. I would get a run in, have a long brunch the next day and do some reading in Central Park. Want to help build the next revolution in database technology? MongoDB offers summer internships and new graduate opportunities to foster computer science talent across the country. Learn more about the MongoDB University Relations program . Or apply to be one of our 2015 Summer Engineering Interns!

September 19, 2014

Intern Spotlight: Walter Menendez

This summer, MongoDB welcomed 33 university students to our intern program in Engineering, Marketing, and Education. In this series, we'll introduce you to the talented students who are helping us transform development and operations for how we run applications today. I had the chance to sit down with Walter Menendez who spent this past summer working with our MMS team! What is your role at MongoDB? I’m at MMS intern, so I’m building the network operations center. How did you find out about the internship program at MongoDB? Why did you choose to come to MongoDB? I knew what MongoDB was because I used it at the media Lab at MIT. They were at our fall career fair and I decided to apply. What’s your hometown? Gaithersburg Maryland, but I was born in LA. Did you have previous experience using MongoDB before you arrived? If so, how are things different now that you work at MongoDB? If not, how did you learn MongoDB and how was the education process? I definitely liked it before I arrived. I learned it before using a relational database model. The education process was nice because it felt like an actual database. It’s different seeing how it works after having a formal education on the database. Bike or public transportation to work? I take the subway. What’s a typical day (or week) for you? I get in and check my emails. I go on to Githup, pull up my Jira tickets. Lunch rolls around and then I keep coding. Daz it. What do you love most about MongoDB? I really like the company. Everyone here seems very intelligent. They have seen some stuff. It’s a very energetic culture. In terms of the product I work on I really like how many things MMS does. I really appreciate going through the codebase and seeing how it all works. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? There are a lot of surprises that come up when I’m coding. It keeps me on my toes. What do you hope to accomplish while you’re here? I definitely want to get better at things that work at scale. The MMS has to handle so much data at once. I want to see what its like to work with something that can scale like that. Meeting the other engineers. MongoDB is such a tech-sexy company. The database is hot. What’s your favorite Seamless lunch order? Schnippers because I like burgers, and their shakes are so AH. Name one secret skill you have, unrelated to work. I do studio portraits and headshots. I also did Taekwondo for a semester. Oh and I speak Spanish. Favorite color and why? I like black because I look good in it. And it’s amazing to accidentally wear everything in black. Black is such an easy color to have large amounts of. Kindle or book? What’s your favorite book? BOOK! With a Kindle you don’t actually own the book. I like owning the book. The Hunger Games gave me a lot of feels. I also read a lot of poetry by Federico Garcia Lorca in High school. He was a Spanish poet. Rumor has it he was assassinated during the Spanish Civil War because he was gay. Describe your perfect weekend. I would wake up at like noon, go work out, go take lots of pictures, and spend the rest of the day on Tumblr. I just want to be on my computer all day. Want to help build the next revolution in database technology? MongoDB offers summer internships and new graduate opportunities to foster computer science talent across the country. Learn more about the MongoDB University Relations program . Or apply to be one of our 2015 Summer Engineering Interns! !

September 18, 2014

Intern Spotlight: Jonathan Mason

This year, MongoDB welcomed 33 university students to our intern program in Engineering, Marketing, and Education. In this series, we'll introduce you to the talented students who are helping us transform development and operations for how we run applications today. I had the chance to sit down with Jonathan Mason who spent this past summer working with our Community Marketing team! Where do you go to school, what is your major, and what year are you in? I’m going into my final year at McGill University. I have a major in History and a minor in Political Science and Economics. What is your role at MongoDB? I work for the Community Marketing team, essentially that means I help produce content and organize events that further MongoDB usage worldwide. How did you find out about the internship program at MongoDB? Why did you choose to come to MongoDB? I found out through a friend who said she loved the company. I chose to come here out of curiosity: I wanted to learn what it meant to work in the tech industry and to see if a Liberal Arts major like myself could handle it. What’s your hometown? I was born in NYC but my family moved upstate to Woodstock, NY after 9/11. In 2011 I moved to Montreal to study at McGill University. Did you have previous experience using MongoDB before you arrived? If so, how are things different now that you work at MongoDB? If not, how did you learn MongoDB and how was the education process? I don’t code, which has made my education process both confusing and enlightening. Ever since I arrived here I have been reading as much as possible about the company and how their product works. I think in the 21st century it is increasingly important to understand the technology that runs our economy and influences our lives. Ever since coming here I find myself asking more questions about the devices we all use on a daily basis but many of us do not understand. Bike or public transportation to work? MTA What’s a typical day (or week) for you? I wake up at 9:00am, put on some pants and stumble into the West village in search of coffee. Then I enjoy a very short commute to Times Square sand begin work. I get off work around 5:30-6:00pm and then usually Skype my girlfriend who is working in Belgium this summer or go run along the West Side Highway. What do you love most about MongoDB? I love the feeling of possibility and growth. Ever since being here I’m starting to view the economy in a different way. Not as something static and closed off, but as an environment full of opportunities for those willing to engage, think, and innovate. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? Learning how the tech industry works in a conceptual sense. It’s a very important industry to understand. What do you hope to accomplish while you’re here? I hope to contribute as much as I can to the vision and image of this company, which I think will accomplish great things. What’s your favorite Seamless lunch order? Anything with Sushi. Name one secret skill you have, unrelated to work. I’m really into memorizing when presidents were in office. I also love maps and geography in general. Don’t know if that counts as a skill or if I’m just weird. Kindle or book? I prefer books but I think we should save the trees. Describe your perfect weekend. Sleep late, wake up somewhere new, spend the day with people I love and talk late into the night. Want to help build the next revolution in database technology? MongoDB offers summer internships and new graduate opportunities to foster computer science talent across the country. Learn more about the MongoDB University Relations program .

September 9, 2014

Intern Spotlight: Jason Hu

This year, MongoDB welcomed 33 university students to our intern program in Engineering, Marketing, and Education. In this series, we'll introduce you to the talented students who are helping us transform development and operations for how we run applications today. I had the chance to sit down with Jason Hu who spent the summer in our Palo Alto office working with the CAP team! Where do you go to school, what is your major, and what year are you in? I'm a rising senior at Brown University, where I study computer science. What is your role at MongoDB? I’m a software engineering intern on the CAP team. How did you find out about the internship program at MongoDB? Why did you choose to come to MongoDB? I actually started computer science a year late, so I didn’t really know about tech companies, let alone MongoDB until late in college. As I did more CS I learned from upperclassmen and recent graduates about the company, and it seemed like a cool mix of technical challenges that thought big. What’s your hometown? I actually grew up in the Silicon Valley—I’m from Los Altos, California. My friends and I would walk by Facebook when it was still a small startup in Palo Alto. Did you have previous experience using MongoDB before you arrived? If so, how are things different now that you work at MongoDB? If not, how did you learn MongoDB and how was the education process? I had no experience whatsoever. To be honest, databases had been a huge, intimidating block of computer science and software engineering that I haven’t really touched before. I figured throwing myself in the deep end would be the best way to learn, and after one week of orientation I definitely learned more than an entire semester. All the on-boarding staff and mentors were terrific—they should consider becoming professors, after they retire. Working on actual projects has also taught me loads about databases—not just how to use them, but how to think about them in the larger picture of an enterprise or business. Bike or public transportation to work? I drive, actually. One of the perks of being at home, I suppose, is having my old car. What’s a typical day (or week) for you? Well, it’s really hard to say since every week I’ve had has been so different. Some days will be very focused, where I can put on some ear-buds and crank out code. Other days will be back-to-back meetings or presentations, where I’ll be learning about MongoDB’s history or theoretical concepts about databases or road mapping my project for the next week. And I can’t forget the fun! A typical week always has a bunch of great events, from smaller game nights to larger company outings, such as to indoor skydiving, Giants games, or go-karting. The intern coordinators really out-do themselves. What do you love most about MongoDB? Definitely how much I’ve learned. I can say without exaggeration that I learned more about databases during onboarding than an entire semester of the class. But it’s more than just coding chops: Watching the ins-and-outs of a startup has been fascinating. For me, it’s easy at school to be stuck in a narrow path of problem solving—improving runtimes, cleaning code, etc.—but the challenges outside of code are usually not so neat and controlled. Hearing about the problems of marketing, finance, design, and HR has been incredibly illuminating for so much work we take for granted. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? Adapting and learning on the fly is definitely something I need to work on more. In school, we have a general sense that a right answer exists, and what it should look like. In engineering in the real world, however, there aren’t necessarily the right answers in the back of the book. Now as an engineering intern, my main challenge isn’t finding the right answer, but rather figuring out whether a problem is feasible, what the solution looks like, and whether it’s worth my time. And this isn’t an easy process. During the course of the summer, as I learned and tested different languages and programs, my project had to change and sometimes backtrack as I adapted. What’s do you hope to accomplish while you’re here? The cool thing about Cluster Bingo was that I got the start it from scratch—decisions for structuring the code, as well as library and language decisions, were all mine. So my goal wasn’t necessarily to rush out a fully functional version. Instead I wanted to think about what are its long-term goals, and how to design it in such away that enabled the growth and continuation of the project after I leave. What’s your favorite Seamless lunch order? Definitely any sandwich from the Ace of Sandwiches. Name one secret skill you have, unrelated to work. I’m a really mean baker. Literally. Apparently I get really bossy, but my cakes also are fantastic. Where do you want to be in five years? I picked this question because, well, as a rising college senior it’s kind of on my mind a lot. The honest answer is “I don’t know,” but I can say that one way or another I know I’ll be programming. Which isn’t necessarily to say I’ll be a software engineer: The past few months, I’ve realized that I can use code within any of my interests—advocating social and economic justice, product design and user interfaces, and even my original major of biology and bioengineering. Given how much my interests and skills have changed in the past five years, it’s impossible for me to really know where I’ll be in the upcoming five. All I hope is to somehow find a way to combine some or all of my interests through coding, whether that’s through a software company, start-up, or NGO. Kindle or book? What’s your favorite book? I haven’t read anything on Kindle yet, so I’m going to have to say books. However, the moment Amazon figures out how to give Kindles that old-book smell, I might have to give it a shot. It’s really hard for me to pick a favorite book, but the one that I always find myself rereading is the graphic novel Blankets by Craig Thompson. His illustrations and paneling are gorgeously done, and he has a great ability of capturing little, human interactions in his characters. Every time I read it I find something new. Describe your perfect weekend. Wake up Saturday morning and start off with hiking or the gym. Then I like going up to a museum in San Francisco: The Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park never gets old. Afterward, catching up with friends over dinner, before going out for the night or hanging out at their apartments. The next morning usually entails people watching in the park, and finally settling into a book on the train ride home.

September 2, 2014

Intern Spotlight: Elle Morris

This year, MongoDB welcomed 33 university students to our intern program in Engineering, Marketing and Education. In this series, we'll introduce you to the talented students who are helping us transform development and operations for how we run applications today. I had the chance to sit down with Elle Morris who spent this summer working with the Marketing Operations team. Where do you go to school, what is your major, and what year are you in? I’m a rising senior at Wharton (University of Pennsylvania) studying Operations and Information management and Statistics. What is your role at MongoDB? Marketing Operations and Analytics intern, analyzing lead generation, the demand-close process, and filling in the blanks as needed. How did you find out about the internship program at MongoDB? Why did you choose to come to MongoDB? I found out about MongoDB at a career fair and then saw them at the PennApps Hackathon. I was interested in the company and found the opportunity online. I came here because this is an exciting company and the position integrates all my areas of interest. What’s your hometown? Celebration, Florida. (Built by the Walt Disney Company.) Did you have previous experience using MongoDB before you arrived? If so, how are things different now that you work at MongoDB? If not, how did you learn MongoDB and how was the education process? I had exposure to MongoDB at PennApps, so had some basic understanding of what differentiated the company, but now I have a much better understanding of why MongoDB is so revolutionary and why it has attracted such a loyal user-base. Bike or public transportation to work? We live in NYC so I think you should delete this question. What’s a typical day (or week) for you? I get into the office around 9:30, sync with my mentor, check email, then I work on a revolving queue of around 4-5 projects depending on the phase of the Lunar calendar. What do you love most about MongoDB? There are a lot of implicit assumptions in that question. But what I love most is the ability to work with very smart people from diverse disciplines that all share a common interest in bettering the product and the company. As an intern on the marketing team I’ve been exposed to a variety of functions within the department and across teams, which has expanded my understanding of how the company functions. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? Prioritizing time, because there is always a trade-off between learning more about something new and moving on to the next project that has to be done. What do you hope to accomplish while you’re here? I hope to be able to explain a very technical concept in simple terms. In practice that means understanding the product, the customer, and how marketing and sales work to connect the two and convey that information to people without a technical background all while being HYPER efficient. What’s your favorite Seamless lunch order? It depends. If I’m going to be very hungry then its Chop’t salad with falafel because its always first to arrive. Otherwise whichever option has the best chocolate chip cookies. Name one secret skill you have, unrelated to work. If I told you it wouldn’t be a secret. Disappears in a puff of smoke

August 26, 2014